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chris fawcett

Steadicam M1 Volt

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More on #7, "getting confused." What you describe in your question it always handles like a charm. Even flipping it upside down, whip panning, and doing all sorts of wild things all at once (we've watched folks try this at demo's...) and it has always worked.

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Hello,
On the two pictures below I noticed that the motors of the M1 volt are setup at the oposite side of the gimble.
The setup on Photo N°1 seems more suitable for goofy (more room for the hand Under the gimble + easier to put on the shoulder for rest position)
The setup on Photo N°2 seems better for regular ops
Can we choose the side of the setup when we order the M1 Volt??
Thanks
Grégory Dupé

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post-11865-0-63315300-1527782308_thumb.jpg

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Yes, viewing seems more important than clearance for the operating hand; photo 1 is more typical for regular operators. BTW, I thought the hand clearance would be the deciding factor when it was designed... so for once something was designed for goofy first.

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the M1 Volt motion tracking algorithm completely covers 360 degrees of roll, tilt, pan with no glitches or dead zones. It always knows camera orientation and pointing direction over the full sphere of motion and does not get lost or confused. Like all inertial navigators it will very slowly lose horizon if you accelerate for minutes at a time. Recovers smoothly when acceleration ceases.

Steve Wagner

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Marco, if you remove the motors, it's still a gimbal like any other, so it can be re-centered.

 

The M1V will compensate for slight imbalances in not so perfect gimbals, and not so perfect static or dynamic balance by the operator.

 

Of course, the more perfect the gimbal and balancing are, the better it works.

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Hey Jerry!

 

What about working in the rain and snow or very low temperatures? Do I have to cover the volt somehow or are the electronics waterproof?

 

cheers

 

Guido

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Guido - The electronics need a cover; a small "skirt" overt the gimbal does the trick nicely. Low temps should not be a problem. It's been tried in pouring rain (Kentucky Derby for one).

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My apologies for resurrecting an old thread.

Tiffen shipped a docking bracket that grabs the sled by the handle on the gimbal. Holding the sled by the gimbal makes sense because of the cables wrapped around the post on the volt might be at risk with the Jerry Hill docking system.  But with a little care, that shouldn't be an issue.

What's everyone using the m1-V doing for docks and carts and Moses poles?

Stirling Bancroft csc

Edited by Stirling Bancroft csc
vanity about grammar

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The docking bracket helps when using the Volt in several ways, including preventing the small possibility of injury to the cables, and preventing a much bigger possibility of injury to the Volt motors and motor electronics.

Also, the dock is padded, so there is less shock on the gimbal bearings when docking. A related minor concern, but still an advantage - no little bits of anodized aluminum get ground off and potentially drop into your gimbal. The gimbal is always at the right height for docking, regardless of how long or short the sled might be. The gimbal can get closer to the stage than with a traditional dock. The primary balancing stud is low and close to the stand center, so there is very little lifting off the dock for balancing (less effort!) and nothing to move around for balancing. Nothing slides or interferes with docking. The over-centers locking lever is easy to use and it is clearly engaged or not, and there is a secondary lock on the OC lever.

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