Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/21/21 in all areas

  1. I've owned the Betz Handhled rig for a number of years and if you are using one camera body for all modes, it is a wonderful device! The baby pin receiver on the bottom is a great addition . Both my ACs and my Dolly Grip on the film I just finished kept commenting on how it was the best setup they've seen. Andre, I do wish the camera were a little lower on the shoulder though - I often just put a long Steadicam plate (like the one Peter Abraham makes) on the bottom of the camera and place that directly on my shoulder so I can find the CG. I was switching between modes so often on this job that I wanted to use my XCS plate (best plate for use within the Wave because of the side-to-side adjustment) at all times and it is too short to put directly on the shoulder. Nice within the Betz unit though as you can slide it to find the CG.
    2 points
  2. This awesome kit has just been sold and will be shipping in person by me to new owner in Germany !
    1 point
  3. Angenieux 16-40 & 30-76mm Optimo Style Zoom Lenses. Both Lenses are in excellent condition. Both of these lenses have PL & Panavision Changeable Mounts. Also, the Angenieux Wide Angle Adapter 0.75x for use on both lenses. Custom cut Case. I've used these 2 lenses on my Steadicam personally. They have been the perfect combination of focal lengths needed for most shots. Unlike the regular Optimo Cine series lenses, these can be used with 4K full sensor cameras. The 16-40 lens has recently been discontinued from the Angenieux catalog. With a wide focal length and weight of approximately 4.2 lbs, it's an extremely valuable lens. Besides the use on the Steadicam, they're excellent choices for gimbal, drones, and the Nauticam Underwater Housing. $ 30,000.00 plus shipping
    1 point
  4. Hello, So I was listening to the Walking Backwards podcast and during one of the conversations the guest op was mentioning the "newer version" of the Volt, which I believe he said smaller motors and maybe something else. Does anyone know the difference between a v1 and a v2 version of the Volt, if there is one?
    1 point
  5. Im currently on a show that requires A Camera to convert to Steadicam. Ive purchased the Betz handheld rig that allows you to take the camera with the steadicam plate and mount directly to handheld mode. I also have the Betz tripodlockplate that allows you to mount to your existing head. The shoulder mount has a pitch adjustment for your shoulder, baby pin receiver, the pad rotates forward and aft and the rosettes can accept several versions of existing grips. You have to tell Betz what brand you have or you can use theirs. It's a great setup. Well made and the support from Munich is amazing. The photo is a Sony Venice with an Arri Signature full frame 35mm prime with shape handles. I'm a fan. Ramon
    1 point
  6. I usually go for a slower drop time when working super low mode. Hand above the gimbal... I don't have any tips... Do as I can ;-)
    1 point
  7. Used - in decent condition! $50 + $9 shipping.
    1 point
  8. Hi Patrick, I agree that the Zephyr vest is great. When Garrett is demoing at a workshop, he always picks up a Zephyr vest. As for the lumbar pad, I don’t think it’s going to have any effect on the working of the vest, but if it feels good, do it! Opinions about support belts differ I side with the argument that if you have a healthy back they just make it weaker, it’s really something you wear under medical advice All the best, Chris
    1 point
  9. Hi All... have a bunch of stuff avail for sale. Have pictures for some, but feel free to reach out with questions etc. Its all used... please feel free to make an offer on anything. 1. I have an interesting carbon fiber erector set... if you're into prototyping or have a use. It was used to build the prototype head for the SuperFlyCam but since decommissioned and disassembled. Pretty cool. See pics. 2. I have a custom case that turns into two trays that can hang off the leg straps of an American stand. Used to use it instead of a cart. Must be an American stand with the narrower leg straps, and it comes with a special collar that you install on the stand to capture the trays. Comes with foam that's cutout to accommodate batteries, and the other tray works great for brackets. Also included is a push bar for the stand (assuming you have wheels on it) so you can push the stand around. The push bar has a flight pin to allow it collapse. See pics. 3. Battery plates...(5) AB Gold mounts, (2) AB to V-Lock, (4) V-lock plates, and (2) AB Gold male plates. 4. Lemo connectors. I have a ton of them used and new. If interested please let me know! Can breakout a list and/or send picts. 5. Ken-lab 24v inverter (guts only). I used this inside some custom electronics. Think they run about $100 new. 6. I have a few cases avail. They are on eBay... here's the link. https://www.ebay.com/usr/tophatprod happy to take anything down and make a deal. 7. Have two Watson sensors for tinkerers. Also on eBay. https://www.ebay.com/usr/tophatprod 8. 3A Gimbal 9. 3A Dovetail plate 10. Also have a bunch of Preston compatible micromos & some slip rings. 11. F-Stop single channel 900GT with an fStop remote transmitter that uses a Preston iris knob as its controller. 12. I have some heavy geared head wheels. Not sure compatibility. Gold color. 13. Have some pelican parts (latches and replacement handles) contact me if interested. Not much value in this... happy to toss it in with something you buy. 14. Telefinder / Cinefinder - have an old carbon fiber video finder. Its basically an antique. Comes with a PV and Arri lens mounts. 15. Low Mode Handle Clamp 16. MDR-2 to Ultra/Master Bracket 17. Paralinx Tomahawk Kit - 1x Transmitter, 2x Receivers & an antenna array in a case (pictures coming) 18. 2x Paralinx brackets 19. Gorelock Docking Collar 20. Stand Cart Hangar
    1 point
  10. Can you talk about balancing the rig with the R2. Are you balancing neutral?
    1 point
  11. the wave separates the camera from gimbal making your sled longer or having you to add more weight at batteries side to compensate. I have been asked to roll rap videos in middle of shot, little tricky to put pin while operating, but once locked your sled will behave quite normal
    1 point
  12. I also own an ArmX1. It‘s been many years that I have tested the G50x and I remember that I liked it, it‘s a good arm for sure. But, for many reasons I would go with the ArmX1, it‘s an amazingly smooth arm, very easy to handle and weighs nothing. On top, I love the mindset of Smartsystem as a company in terms of customer relations. You can always get a hold of them, they‘re very responsive and try to help as quick as possible. So yeah definitely worth its money. Cheers
    1 point
  13. Hey Gabe, You can lock the Wave. There is a single locking pin that is used to lock and unlock the wave during transport and operating. Personally I'd say the biggest difference is that the Wave is a single axis "stabilizer" where the Volt is a three axis motorized assist. Also, the Wave mounts to the top stage and the Volt is at the gimbal. Both require finesse in operating. The Wave, if not properly balanced, can get away from you and won't make your shots any easier (there is a video from Betz that explains how to get the camera's center of gravity set within the Wave, separate from the center of gravity on the sled itself). You also operate as you would with any "analogue" gimbal. The Volt has resistance controls that you can adjust which gives you more all around assist and freedom in your operating, still requires finesse, but is more forgiving. Since the Volt is balanced and generally operated in neutral, it will make those big roll moves you're talking about easier to achieve, especially with some of the electronic assist it provides in the motors. The Wave has no drop time requirements, it's solely based on the operators preference. Hope this helps.
    1 point
  14. This is a 1st Gen Steadicam Flyer package that I picked up last summer and modified as a project. Now for sale! The Flyer was the first of Tiffen’s really serious lightweight rigs that could be used for professional jobs. It supports cameras in the 15 pound range, which while limiting for big jobs, would allow you to fly a lot of the smaller cinema cameras that are now out. This rig has been re-wired for an HD-SDI line down the post, as well as a more modern Tiffen-standard 3 pin power plug. The rig has a baseplate with standard 15mm rods on it, allowing for monitor and battery mounting, and a lot of flexibility in terms of which monitor you can use. Includes arm and vest, both in working order, though all of the pieces show signs of use. Asking $2000 for this rig (arm, vest, and sled together) plus shipping, or pickup in the New York/NJ area. Contact me at willsvideo@gmail.com or 215-796-8938 if you’re interested (please be patient, as I’m working!)
    1 point
  15. Bump still for sale! $6000obo
    1 point
  16. Kevin and Jerry, thanks for weighing in on this! I’m with you, never want to be reliant on an assistive feature, but would be a nice safety net on pro jobs. The seller is also offering me two days of training if I fly out to pick the unit up. So based on your price opinion, Kevin, I feel like this is a safe deal.
    1 point
  17. I disagree. Keep the Volt. Practice like hell without it, but there is zero point in risking a minor horizon flub when on a real job. The point is to get the shot, and get it well. Who cares how on the day? It's your career and reputation for getting the shot, being efficient, artistic, pleasant to work with... and the Volt will only help you.
    1 point
  18. I’m in Los Angeles area! Text me for faster service 313-473-7335 ask for Mike
    1 point
  19. Price Drop 1500€ Killer Deal
    1 point
  20. hey yall i recently came into a good deal on a magliner (thanks will!) that had made its way over from my hometown (thanks ramon!) and it needed a bit of love. this very well-used magliner had clearly been shipped around and tossed around, so I figured Id put some time into it and try to make it a bit more of my own. I wish Id taken some "before" photos, but youve all seen a magliner, just add about a dozen shipping labels and torn paper labels on each shelf, tons of build-up on the wheels and bearings, a split U-handle with almost a whole roll of packaging tape wrapped around every end to protect the hands (because the cut edges were really nasty and jagged and definitely would have sliced open any exposed skin), rusty screws and washers, and some peeling carpeting. all in, i probably spent maybe 100-150 on materials and help. i had a few meterials (paint, etc) laying around from pervious projects. First, i diassembled the entire thing. the only stuff that stayed intact were races and bearings in the wheels. I wanted to see if a superficial cleaning and greasing of the wheels would be enough, rather than really opening them up. Thankfully superficial was plenty. A bunch of scrubbing and white lithium grease got these wheels spinning like yo-yos. I took the brakes off and put them in a vice and re-bent them so that the wheels wouldnt scrape the brakes and the lever action worked properly. After a few years of pressing on these brakes, they start to slip more and more. Every screw and washer spent about 24 hours in an apple-cider vinegar bath. once or twice during that period of time i pushed the pieces around, flipped em over, and took a hard bristle tooth brush to some of the items and the rust just slipped right off, if its hadnt already been eaten away. in order to clean the metal parts of the disassembled wheels, the u-handle, and some other pieces, i made a paste out of water and sodium bicarbonate. this plus a sponge cleaned a good bit of adhesive and gunk off and sparkled some surfaces right up. baking soda is cheap and safe so it was the first round of cleaning. i started stripping the dried adhesive from the shelf carpeting with a paint scraper, but it was just gunna take more time than I wanted to commit, plus the adhesive stuff on the bottom of the shelves was gunna be a bitch, so I went to a machine shop down the street and asked them to blast both shelves, the U-handle base, as well as the steadicam-stand guides. They did it for $80 in a few hours. The gentleman who blasted it said that the sandblaster wouldnt take off some of the tacky residue, so he ended up scraping it himself. At least I didnt have to. I also had him recut the U-handle (which had the really nasty and dangerous edges) and file down the edges for safety. I repainted pretty much everything with two coats of DupliColor Bed Armor (truck bed liner, like cheaper LineX). On one motorcycle I used the rattle can version of this which worked well, but I decided to roll-on this time. I do not really recommend it, as it wound up sorta clumpy and required some extra work to smooth out. Then I did three coats of matte automobile clear coat with an HVLP spray gun. I used about 80% of a small paint can for this. Both shelves we re-carpeted. I just played around with this. I picked up a few free samples of some other carpet patterns and astroturf and cut squares in the carpet to insert these. I have found that sometimes when building out a camera or whathaveyou that I place tools and screws in random areas, then I scan all over trying to find what I put where. These little squares are meant just as helpful "color coding" and memory-helpers. I used medium coats of Loctite spray adhesive on the carpet and shelf surface and then laid the carpets in. I picked up liquid nails just in case, but I dont want it to be super permanent, in case I decide to do this again in the future. Beware that the rubber surface on the back side of the carpeting peels right off once you stick it to a surface and then lift it up to adjust the position. Now that everything is back together, it drives like a dream.
    1 point
  21. Looking to hear what all of you have going for rain cover solutions for your monitor when it comes to salvaging the most viewable image available. Obviously going without a cover in light rain is preferable, but when it gets heaviest or rain towers, we all have to button up. What tricks do you have up your collective sleeves? I've always used saran wrap and just toughed it out, but it leaves a lot to be desired if you you are fighting to see with bright, overhead silks. Any particular plastics out there anyone knows of? maybe dedicated hard plastic with anti-glare on it that can be welded into a wrap around cover? Any new tech that improves this situation? Also for you Transvideo guys, how much water do you let touch the monitor before you wrap it up? Thanks!
    1 point
  22. I received a call for a commercial from a UPM that told me the ASC camerman had requested me. I hadn't worked with him in several years so it was good to hear that I might get another chance. The UPM then started asking me if I had rain/water covers for my gear, and was quite serious in her tone. I asked what the conditions were likely to be so that I could be prepared and supplement the gear I had. She told me that I would be strapped onto the back of a waverunner shooting surfers in action with my steadicam. I politely reminded her that if I was doing the shot while wearing the vest I would drown if I got knocked off by a wave, and hardmounting to a vehicle driving through the surf didn't sound like the right tool for the job and certainly not the safest way to do it. I wished her luck on the job and that was the last I heard of it. Hopefully they found another way of doing it. Please keep this topic active - very interesting what we are asked to do! Brooks
    1 point
  23. Grant, I think you made a great decision, and Im sure that it took an enormous amount of pressure off of the performers for you to stand up and make it less about them and more about the shot. Great job dude. I do a show which involves a lot of sexual assault and at the beginning of each episode I have a small talk with our female actors and letting them know that safety and respect is important to me. Ive yelled our safety word more than once as a result of a dangerous situation or something going awry. Since I am usually closer to the performers than anyone else, often in their grills, I want them to be communicative with me about any discomfort they have with the shot. NO is the most powerful word in your vocabulary. There is a fair amount written about the value of NO and how is can actually help your career. Every year, my wife and I decide on a "word of the year" that helps to promote a philosophy that wed like to live out in our lives that year. The most memorable to me has been ACTIVATE-stop thinking so hard, make your decision, do it. This very often comes in the form of NO. Dont waffle. Decide. There are two experiences I recall, though I am sure there are more. I am happy, often thrilled, to do some dangerous stuff, as long as safety is considered, but sometimes theres just stupid ideas. Recently I was shooting at a river and there was a lane of large rocks protruding from the water, creating a bit of a dam. I work in the water a lot, but I am usually in it, not atop it. The director wanted a low mode tracking shot on a wide lens across the rocks, looking back towards the beach. Even the grip who would have been spotting me would have been in an extremely difficult situation. I knew I wouldnt do the shot, but to humor him and make my decision seem valid (and hell, why not take a five minute break to walk in the river?!), I walked the path sans rig and came back to the director and just said there is no safe way of achieving the shot, but Id be happy jump in the water and plant the camera on sticks and get the lens at low mode level. We wound up doing that and the director was satisfied. I also had the key grip and DP on my side, so there was no problem. Presenting a suitable alternative helped. Before I accept a job I ask a series of questions, and one of them is "will my feet ever leave the ground?" I accepted a music video gig and show up to find out that they have discussed a shot with a step-off. I asked them about which crane theyd be using they said "no crane, the warehouse has a forklift and some pallets. I was amused and not totally scared away, so I asked if they had the COI for me. They said they couldnt get one in time so I said not to the shot and then the video. If a production cant get it together enough to call in a COI by the time I show up, then its just not worth the risk. I realize that the COI isnt binding in any way, but it reveals a lot to me about how the shoot may go and by that point my expectations were set. Spent the day on my bike cruising up to Port Hueneme, so it was a good day. brett.
    1 point
  24. Ah ! This is quite dangerous but reminds me of a deeply amusing ( and embarassing ) story. In the summer of 2006 I shot a tour through Ontario of Blues Festivals. I was traveling with The Detroit Women. Amazing group of singers with a killer band behind them. We were in a small town called Porquis Junction, Iroquois Falls, Ontario. TINY town. They hosted this Blues Festival in the ice skating rink every summer. It's just insanely hot and humid. No rope line for a barrier, but before the show started I walked along, getting people to step back to where I'd need them to be. Many were already drunk, none were jerk offs and I figured I'd be just fine. We get set, our band goes on and because the stage was quite tight there, I was limited to being the "human dolly", tracking back and forth during the entire set. We've all done those. Before we even get started, I'm quite sweaty. By the end of the second song I'm just drenched. And yet....and yet... as I do a move from one edge of the stage line on the floor moving to center, with the lead singer in my frame, I come to a stop. And two hands very firmly grab my butt cheeks. I hold my shot and turn and look and see two very inebriated young women laughing. I had no rope line- and had no need for one. It was a very weird moment. I moved away doing a shot. EVERY single time I stopped near center to concentrate on the lead singer, that gal's hands held onto my bum. Sometimes one, usually two. I knew I was drenched and was part irritated, part grossed out and part flattered. They just kept laughing. And doing it. Not once did they reach out for me as I was operating. When the band finished, I walked up to them. Just dripping with sweat. They were both laughing and grinning. I said, so.... what's the deal? One said, " It's her birthday- give her a kiss ! " I wished her a happy birthday, shook her hand and bailed. I hadn't thought of that in years till I read the post quoted above. :D
    1 point
  25. Well I took the plunge & removed the mini-DIN on the Flyer monitor cable, & answered my own question above. I wanted to rewire my Flyer LE to run a Marshall V-LCD70XHB-3GSDI 7" HD-SDI monitor, which for the money has got to be the best value 7" monitor out there (yeah yeah, it's no Cinetronic, but you wouldn't put a Cinetronic on a Flyer, it costs almost as much as the rig!) but was uncertain about the existing loom specifications. Very happily I found that the original internal Flyer video loom WILL take HD-SDI with good signal strength through the rig. Removing the existing mini-DIN connector revealed SEVEN small wires going to the connector. They are: a Yellow coax video cable, 2 x Red (one coax), 2 x Whites (one coax), a Black, and a Brown wire. From there it was simply a question of putting a BNC on the end of the video wire, and XLR 4 pin on the correct power wires, with some strain relief of course. The Flyer LE now powers the monitor directly and happily runs composite, SDI, and HD-SDI through the rig from the original BNC input on the stage to the new BNC connector at the bottom. I expected to have to run an new cable down the post for HD-SDI, but no need! The Marshall displays 70% signal strength & everything looks very neat and tidy. I'll put some pictures up when I get a mo. This mod will of course allow the Flyer to run any monitor that take XLR 12v power & video through BNC, or RCA with adaptor, & I don't see why this simply fix wouldn't work on an original Flyer, well as LE, F24, Pilot, Scout, etc. which all take composite video through the rig in the same way. Happy flying - now in HD!
    1 point
  26. Hi Michael, It might be an operating issue as well. Some walking styles—and I'm categorically not saying better or worse here—exhibit more of a bounce than others. One of my favourite exercises is a the slow walk, and I always grab a rig at workshops and walk a line or two, so I've flown many G50s & 70s, and haven't experienced the bounce problem. I'll put ISO on full, then back it off till the arm flows. I usually back it further off in the inner section than the outer. I'll crank the lift up so each arm section rides a little high, then I'll bear down on the arm somewhat. Maybe this helps break the stiction. I look forward to experimenting more with the new bearings to see if they change my approach. All the best, Chris
    1 point
  27. Cardio... which I do none of and Abs (Core) will support your back... which I also do none of oh yeah, squats for you knees... which I do none of I guess what I'm saying is that you will gradually build the muscles needed to do the job... just the other day on a live show, the utility was asking me if I wanted my dock... I said no. It was more work for her to drop the cables and fly the dock over for me to rest for all of a minute and the run it back off the set and get back to me before the count down. Pop open the vest and put the sled on the shoulder is what I do and she asked me was I trying to be He-man? Nope, just didn't see the need for it... I wasn't like I was exerting energy standing at rest, now IF I had just jogged up a graded incline on a two minute take... NO TIME TO GET THE DOCK!!! TAKE THE RIG!!! But IF I was to hit the gym... defiantly the core muscles and get use to stretching like a runner... THAT will help tremendously.
    1 point
  28. Charles, I think the point where the effort to boom all the way up or down was equal for the IIIa type arms was slightly below level, and the "equal effort" point for the single spring arms was slightly above level, hence the general recommendation. It's of little matter with the iso arms, so it's more a matter of feel - what you like. I tend to set the arm I use most (the G-70) slightly higher than level because I don't have as much power to boom up as I have to boom down, unless, of course, the shot is low, and then I let it float at the nominal lens height or close to it. If I have an extra minute, I'll set to arm to float so I do the least work. For Blair, it's most important that the section nearest the body (the upper arm) tracks with the forearm section. How you stand and walk (your posture) can affect how the arm behaves - so do all your adjustments standing in good posture with the rig in balance with you. Jerry
    1 point
  29. If you had another camera that could shoot you while you were walking, that would give us more information on how to help you. Both of the guys had reasonable advice, even though seemingly contradictory. It's all in how you describe it. The arm (gimbal handle) hand is responsible for setting and maintaining the height of the rig; if you allow it to bounce with the up and down motion of your body, that will translate into the rig and cause the vertical movement you are seeing. If you are new or newish to operating, chances are you need to keep a pretty good hold on the rig to have it fly where you want (once you get solid with the hip to rig relationship, it is generally less critical as the rig will naturally fly alongside your body where you want it without having to be reined in). Let your arm be a separate entity from your body, from the shoulders down, and focus on your hand holding the gimbal at a constant height to the ground (while your body "bobs" separately). Same advice for your operating hand, of course. So as you can see this is somewhere between Blair's suggestion to grab on tight and Ken's to let it float. While it's not necessary to perform a handheld style walk, for some people their standard walk is too plodding and needs some smoothing out. This will make it harder to keep the arms from translating said plodding into the rig itself as discussed above. Most operator's walk with the rig ends up being somewhat smoother than regular walking but not as highly smoothed out as handheld. It does require you to maintain complete balance at all times and all speeds. I would indeed experiment with the tension of the arm (super simple, just the two knobs on top of the arm) as Ken suggests; too much tension will make the rig bounce. I wouldn't want to speculate on the vest without seeing it in action.
    1 point
  30. Just got dailies back from a shot I did where I slowly walked through an airplane cargo hold. Pretty much one of the worst types of shots because there were plenty of strong horizontal and vertical lines to give away horizon errors, no actor to draw attention away from the background, and they wanted me to walk nice and slow. Well, the horizons looked pretty good and I felt pretty good doing the shot but watching dailies I cringed because it has a bit of a walking feel to it as opposed to a "camera on a string" feel. Wondering what sort of advice you all have regarding this. Loosen the spring tension? Walk a certain way? Dan
    1 point
  31. Sometimes we all feel like a broken record (remember those?)... anyway, all these sorts of questions and concerns are worked on in workshops, this is basic stuff. So for basic stuff, take a workshop and get a comprehensive overview so that the bits of cherry picked advice given here on the forum fit into a larger picture ? rather than it is your picture. So many of the tips and ideas (even in short workshops) are useful only if you have some perspective... Sometimes even during a workshop it's very hard to figure out why someone's basic technique isn't working, there's some nuance of posture, handgrip, some combination of obscure things that come together to screw up the operating, and it takes a while to sort it out. Techniques that work for most or for one operator don't always translate well to others. One avenue other than the broken record, "take a workshop," route will soon be available for $20 - the re-mastered EFP Video training manual on DVD, with Ted and yours truly demoing the basics, about as comprehensively as possible in the time alloted. It's not a workshop; nobody's watching you operate closely over and over, but you can see what decent, basic technique looks like and what it gets you. And I look younger! And it's now so easy to ignore the EFP specific stuff (use the remote, Luke)... Jerry
    1 point
  32. Marty here, Loosen the two button head socket screws located on the stage top. I believe it is a 1/8 hex, loosen these screws and re-torque them gradually while checking the cross shaft to see if it gets tight. If this does'nt do it there is two set screws located in the dovetail which these button head are screwed in to. Carefully back these of 1/16 of a turn and tighten button heads making sure there is no play in the dovetail plate. If you need more help just call us. Marty Joseph Tiffen Co 818 843-4600 Ex 20
    1 point
  33. Based on this conversation, I put on the rig and did some movements paying specific attention to the level of control with each hand. My results indicate: 1. Gimbal hand - ALWAYS light touch. even when tilting. Only enough pressure to control the shot. 2. Non-operating hand, boom hand, hand that controls the arm, whatever. - Slightly stiffer grip when booming but when walking, especially slow, very light touch. The more I grip with this hand the more my slight momnetum changes get tranlated through to the arm showing my footsteps. Thanks for that. I've gotten into a specific feel of operating and making myself isolate different areas of input to the rig and seeing the result has been a good eye opener. Proper rig adjustment is the key and letting the rig do what it is designed to do is working better than over controlling. I remember seeing a clip of GB rounding a corner and walking with the rig and not touching it at all. I can't imagine really operating like that but the point he was making was that the rig does what it is designed to do, don't mess it up with too much human input. Do only what you need to do for the shot. All this is most likely obvious to experienced ops but for my learning experience it has been a good thing. Best, Kevin
    1 point
  34. You shouldn't have to walk any differently. As you can see above there are lots of opinions... and many of them valid. It's very important to have tuned your arm properly. The key here is that both sections are working together... so if you find one bone bottoming out before the other... then you're not tuned right. They should both hit the bottom and top of their range simultaneously. However, the type of arm DOES make a big difference in performance. Having started years back with an SK arm (only one articulating section), then going to a pro-vid arm (basically 2 x SK Arm Sections), and now owning an Ultra Arm... there's a huge difference between arms. Design is everything, and there have been vast improvements over the years. For instance, with the G50 and G70 arms you have the ability to tune your ride. This is a really powerful feature! And finally, there's operator technique. As always, you want to be flying the rig with your body... and your hands should be doing as little as possible to get the shot. If you're fighting the rig at all... you're screwed. Good Luck!
    1 point
  35. Your arm controls the arm in space, and you are the only thing that will ultimately dampen the spring action of the mechanical arm. Better, more iso-elastic arms will require less effort to dampen, but ultimately, it's your insistence on a given height and path that will keep the rig there. Shots without actors bobbing about are tough to keep perfectly on line (no distractions), but then buildings don't miss their marks, jump out of frame, or forget lines... Practice, practice, practice. If it were easy... Jerry
    1 point
  36. I second that, loosen the springs so that your Gimbal arm, (as opposed to your post arm), is carrying more of the weight- thus lessening the effectiveness of the Steadicam arm. It will add a glide to your stride, and a dip from your hip will not disturb the mothership. Hope that it helps. Funky, CP
    1 point
  37. -Beaming- I am pleased to say that I taught Brant how to operate in D.J., as he took my Rockport Workshop approximately 2 thousand years ago. Charles is right- I am a huge advocate of it. I use it frequently and since I was taught that the rig doesn't give a rat's ass which way you are standing in relation to it, as long as the operating level is clean and fine, why not D.J. ? Unless pressed to, I hesitate to do it on live t.v. events because switching with cables is a hump. I did some D.J. work for the Atlanta Olympics Opening Ceremonies- but had a minute or two between shots so that I could re-orient my cable for the position. I would never argue with the fact that it is a visual compromise as well as a physical irritation. However, since I have used it for as long as any other technique, and rely upon it heavily, I can't imagine NOT thinking of D.J. as an option for many shots. Different strokes- if the shot works and the work is clean, then hey! Go for it. Best to all, Peter Abraham p.s. Charles Papert is just as fun as always to hang with. p.p.s. His girlfriend is staggeringly lovely. Bastahd. :P
    1 point
  38. I don't mind DJ, it can be useful for faster paced moves, although I would always prefer to do it with the Marell electronic bubble for some extra confidence in my horizon! I much prefer walking backwards, helps with composition and control (and for video, easier to control zoom movements). I will only walk backwards if I'm working with one of my usual guys to have behind me, just in case. Even in DJ it is useful to have your assistant at your side or somewhere in front of you to clear the path / guide you through.
    1 point
  39. One trick to make DJ a bit more bearable is this: I use a short extension rod, about 12-15cm (5"-6") rod with a hole in one side and a stud for the gimbal pickup on the other. This makes my arm a bit longer, it gives more clearance when switching from Regular to DJ I also use this with low mode, to get more clearance.
    1 point
  40. Gents-- I would prefer not to use DJ but it has proven to be a "must have" ability that gets out and used more than most would admit. Just last summer, I executed a shot in Fenway Park out on the hallowed grass, that totaled over 1,100 feet in running length. I preceeded a Red Sox pitcher, Bronson Arroyo, and his band, from the Sox' dugout down the First Base line, past the bag and out across Center Field, through the back wall, under the bleachers and around the concession area, switched to Missionary and then followed the group out the back of the Park, down the street, across the street, up a ramp, turn 90* and into Club Avalon through the stage door right onto the stage where the band starts playing. All in one shot, one take, LIVE. The feed from my camera, PS SDX-900, was hardwired into a video truck and projected onto a massive screen in the Club. So the screaming fans knew we were coming and had nothing to do but watch my shot and then erupt into more screaming and yelling. About 1,200 people in the Club, mostly young scantily clad women in heat. The scent hit me as we entered through the stage door along with the adreneline shot and relief of making the trip without hastle or hiccup. Tried to work it out through the four rehearsals as a walking backwards routine but gave in to pain and drove the shot home in DJ for over some 800' of travel. I use DJ without fear but as many have said, not always the first choice. Best, Brant S. Fagan, SOC Steadicam/Camera Operator
    1 point
  41. What you are describing sounds like you are slightly swaying sideways when walking slow and taking the sled with you. When walking very slowly straight towards an foreground object the swaying of your body and sled moves the back ground slightly left to right. When passing by an object (closing in and moving sideways) the left right movement of your body becomes part of the tracking speed. It slows down or even stops your slow tracking and speeding it up again by shifting the weight to the other side. Because you are walking so slowly the mass of the sled tends to follow you more. There are two things you have to practice: first walking more deliberate, second separate your body movement even more from the sled. Hope this makes any sense and sorry for the rant. Best
    1 point
  42. Hello again, I think the problem it´s in the way you take the gimbal handle when you walk forward. Do you notice more walking forward than backward? Think, that when you walk back, you tend to pull from the gimbal with the position hand and when you walk forward, you push with this hand. The problem is to push the gimbal. Try the following. Rotate your body a little more frontal from the sled and with the position hand, try to pull the gimbal and not push, lifting a little your elbow. It isn´t a natural way for walking but it works. Think, that the way you walk is very important too. Yo must try to make soft steps with a foot on the other. I see that you tried the arm with the tension in the middle of the boom range. Try to loose the springs a little more (about 10 degrees under horizontal bones), lift the arm to the headroom with your position hand, and will work even better for slow steps. Best Nacho Minguez Steadicam Owner/Operator SPAIN nachostd@terra.es
    1 point
  43. It's only because I'm too lazy to walk quickly, really. (thanks Alec!)
    1 point
  44. It's helpful to tuck one foot behind the other when walking backwards (for me the right foot goes behind the left) to keep in a straight line. The important thing is to focus on moving the rig at a constant speed independently of your feet. This becomes a function of your hands' positions--concentrate on having the gimbal hand (not the one on the post) driving the rig like it's on a conveyor belt.
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...