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  1. This is my personal technique for making whip pans. I’m sharing here in hopes that it might help a newer operator who is looking to improve their whip pans during this quarantine.
    16 points
  2. This is the original forum for discussing steadicam. The Facebook group is a cascade of posts. It is easier to find and reference archived information here which makes this a better place for any info to be posted. If you have info, it would be great to post it here for all to be able to read, see, etc instead of directing someone to go to yet another place. Not everyone has time to scroll through countless posts on a Facebook page just to find a bit of info on a new piece of gear. Grayson Grant Austin, SOC
    8 points
  3. I just completed 6 weeks of production, but some of my working conditions were unique to our production, and most likely not going to be duplicated by any other shows. For example, there was no negotiation regarding PPE. If you were an on set position (the red wristband zone), you were required to wear the provided KN95 masks and face shields, no exceptions. We had health and safety compliance staff all over production enforcing these rules, and our director was the most stringent enforcer of all. He would yell at anyone he saw with their mask below their nose, or the wrong mask, and don't even think about sneezing or coughing anywhere NEAR set. He himself was wearing a $3000 helmet with a hose connecting to a filter on his hip (sound is gonna have a field day in post). As such, I had to get used to 12 hour days, all steadicam, with a KN95 mask and face shield. I had to learn how to breathe in them, and find little moments in between setups to catch my breath off set. There was no choice. After a while, I realized the key was swapping them out for new ones more frequently as I was sweating, as they become a serious problem when the slightest bit wet. I had to abandon wearing my glasses, because I couldn't deal with them fogging up. I recommend contacts or just forgoing glasses altogether. EAR SAVERS ARE A MUST-HAVE. I cannot stress this enough. For face shields, I found that wearing them at an angle, up on top of my forehead a bit, worked perfectly for steadicam. That way, when i look down at my monitor, it protects my head fully while not obstructing the view of my steadi monitor. Using a hat or sweat band as a guide for the face shield band helped a lot. I also developed an order of operations for everything I had to wear on my head: Mask first, then sweat band, then face shield, then Comm headset. Hand sanitizer was overflowing, all over the lot. You could get a handful whenever you wanted, no matter where you were. When your EP is a germophobe, hand washing stations will be everywhere. Also, as far as who can or cannot touch my rig, there were no issues. It was an already established rule on our set that only the 1st AC could touch my camera and only my designated grip could help touch my rig. This was a minor hindrance for the 2nd AC's and some of the camera utilities, but they were overwhelmed with other responsibilities so it ended up working out fine for us. I had a personal Steadicam Grip named Zavier who stuck to me like glue all day, helping me move my rig when I asked, holding a pogo between shots, and spotting me all day. I was his only responsibility.
    7 points
  4. Patrick, Please please do NOT become dependent on the Volt. If you have as much passion as you seem to have (referring to your first post on this thread) you should learn to be a good Steadicam Operator without it. You seem to have great respect for Garrett and Jerry and the entire world of Steadicam, to learn without using the volt (as they had and most of us had to) would be a great way to express that respect, IMHO. Your fellow op, - Kat
    7 points
  5. I myself prefer a short rig but will change that based on what is needed within the majority of a shot. So, if I need the lens at a higher or lower height I will change that to a longer rig. Danny, take advice from the guy with more experience and who actually wrote the book on Steadicam, contributed to Steadicam with multiple inventions and who has devoted decades of his life to teaching Steadicam Operating to thousands of people across the globe. My two cents.
    6 points
  6. "Undercutting" comes naturally early in your career. You do not have the experience quite yet to be charging what experienced ops charge. Make sure production knows why though, as you don't want them having high expectations. Also, don't take a gig if you aren't ready for it. Word travels fast which can either work against you or for you. Best of luck and you have us all for information and help. Also, nothing against Greg but taking a SOA workshop will also work in your favor. Many experienced ops to learn from, giving you exposure to different techniques from different people. Discover what works or doesn't work for you. You will develop your own style in time, generally a combo of what you have learned from the various instructors. Any questions, feel free to ask.
    6 points
  7. If you don't have any other choice, this could help you : - Have an assistant Raising or lowering your docking stand to the correct height for the shot - Put your Sled on the balancing stud - Put a magic arm between your post and the stand - Frame the shot, than tighten the magic arm Not as sturdy as a tripod but can sometimes help.
    6 points
  8. A little personal story that I would like to share. Back in 2012 I started having some right knee problems. My right knee had had issues since I was 15 y.o. as I had a skiing accident and I blew my ACL, nevertheless it never got reconstructed. It all started as pain and slowly I started losing strength on my knee. I was in the middle of shooting a long series so you can imagine the struggle I was going through. The situation kept getting worse and worse. I had made plans so see and specialist but in the Canadian health care system you have to wait for your turn so I was doing due diligence. I began to fear for my job. We still had a few episodes to shoot on my show and my situation was getting worse and worse. Half of my energy was directed towards not letting it show on set. The last thing you want is you Steadi guy to be limping around. I crawled towards the end of the show and finished it. By then, I was a disaster, things like going downstairs or getting out of the car were a huge struggle for me, not alone flying the rig, go figure. I finally meet the orthopedist and the prognosis was a lot worse that my nightmares, I had severe osteoarthritis on my right knee and the only solution was to go for a full knee replacement. Having had blown my ACL at 15 and living through really crappy healthcare (another story for another time) lead to extreme wear and tear of the cartilage on my right knee. I had a long chat with the specialist and he said that I could go for the knee replacement right away back in 2012 but he would recommend (due to my age at the time) that I would wait as long as I could. That the replacement was not a permanent solution and that I could get better with physiotherapy while postponing the knee replacement. My whole world just collapsed, at the end of the day making a living as a camera/Steadicam operator and to make things worse I’m a very passionate downhill skier. My livelihood and my hobby were all of a sudden going down the drain. Needless to say I went into a downwards spiral and I had no idea about where to move to. I was panicking. I started doing physio and spending very long hours at the gym trying to get out of that mess. It was indeed a very slow process. The biggest question on my head was weather I was going to be able to continue doing Steadi on the short term and more importantly weather I was going to be able to do it after having a full knee replacement done. I had nobody to ask to. I asked my doctor, I tried to explain in detail what we do and what it implies and he said than he thought it would be OK. I asked my physiotherapist, I tried to explain in detail what we do and what it implies and he said than he thought it would be OK. But at the end of the day what we do it very hard to explain to a “regular” folk, so I asked myself, “who knows the most Steadicam operators on this planet?” Garrett! I reached out to Garrett hoping he would know a Steadi op that had had a full knee replacement so I could contact him and get some light on this dark hour. I remember his answer very well “ I don’t and if I do probably he/she is hiding it is because of the same reason you are “. Wow! He blew my mind but he was so right, last thing we want is people thinking we can’t do our job. Especially when it is so physically demanding. Time passed and I was fully committed to get ahead and go back to set and to the slopes. It was not easy, it was exactly the opposite of it, it was hard, slow and really annoying but I got there. About 6 months after that I was back on my feet flying the right and skiing. I managed not only to get my strength back but to be pain free. I never took anything more than over the counter Advil for pain. Life went on for 6 years, I was pain free and I kept working and skiing. I had to meet with my surgeon once a year just to make sure everything was still OK. You have to remember that I still needed to get my knee replaced, I was just buying time before the big surgery. Then 2018 came, I had my yearly visit with the doctor and he asked me “how are you doing, can you go for another year without the surgery?”, I just said yes, everything was great. But this time instead of him saying “that’s great, see you in a year” he mentioned that I should not wait for the replacement for too much longer. My cartilage was completely worn out on the right side of the knee and I was bone on bone. Even when I was functional and pain free waiting for too much longer would compromise the replacement efficiency so we went ahead and scheduled the surgery for January 2019. Needless to say I was petrified, I did not what to expect. In 6 years nobody could tell me weather the implant was going to be good enough so I could get back to work as a Steadi op but I had to go ahead with it. I Went into the operating room, things went well and the surgery was a success, now it was time for a very long and very, very, VERY painful recovery, at the end of the day they cut the two biggest bones of your body to place the implant so you can imagine the level of pain. I did my physio and slowly I went back to work, not doing Steadi but operating on a very nice show that I have being doing for a few seasons. Eventually, about 5 months after the surgery I took my first Steadi day, things went actually pretty well. That cloud that was roaming over me for several years was finally dissipating, I could fly the rig with a full Knee replacement!!! Things were not as smooth after that but I don’t want to bore you with details, suming up my implant got infected and I had to have a second surgery and thankfully we won the battle against the bacteria. They say is only a 0.04% chance of these implants to get infected, well… I should have had bought a lottery ticket. I contacted Garrett again to report about the progress of this story and he suggested that I would share my story on the forum so here I am. Sharing it so other operators with similar struggles could reach out. No longer I fear people thinking I can’t do My job. I just did a 2 pages and change oner on my current show (Amazon’s American Gods), 15 takes and not for a second I had to think about my knee, I think that qualifies as trial under fire. Now my story is out in the open, if any of you need somebody to approach about this sort of heath issues I would be more than happy to help
    6 points
  9. Hello Tomasso, The quick answer to your question is - "it depends". For most full-sized rigs (I.E. M1, Ultra2, XCS Ultimate, GPI PRO, MK-V, etc...) the sled is not sold with a specific weight limit, or is sold with a weight limit that exceeds the weight limit of arms on the market. This is not always very helpful, as some sleds are built more rigidly than others, and will cope with heavier weights better than others. In real terms, I'd expect any sled in this class to be able to support 40-50 pounds of camera payload (though some will support much more, and some may support this in a less than optimal way). With smaller rigs, sleds are often built down to a specific size, weight, or cost level, and may not be capable of supporting the heaviest of loads. The Archer2 is a prime example of this. The post diameter is smaller (although not much), the stage is smaller and uses a smaller size dovetail, and the gimbal, most importantly, is designed to be small and lightweight. The combination of these factors mean that if you overload the suggested payload of the Archer 2, you will almost certainly get vibration in your shots, and there have been many people who have broken their gimbals (I have known at least one personally), either dropping the camera and causing damage, or at least taking their sleds out of commission for some time while they are serviced. For an even more extreme example, a lot of Zephyr owners found that even though their rigs were rated for 24 pounds of camera, they could put over 30 pounds of camera on it before the arm started sagging, and did so. Later many of these same owners had to send their rigs back to Tiffen for new bearings and new gimbal parts, as they had destroyed their gimbals. For each rig, and each manufacturer, things may be different. For instance, with Tiffen's smallest rigs, the "payload" designation often refers to everything you add to the sled - batteries, camera, focus units, etc..., and sometimes even just refers to the weight carrying capacity of the arm. So the Aero 30 doesn't support a 30 pound camera, but has a 30 pound capacity arm. The Archer's weight limit is likely in the sled more than the G50 arm, as the sled doesn't weigh 20 pounds (the G50 arm supporting 50 pounds, and the Archer2 saying its payload is about 30 pounds). The Shadow is basically a full-sized rig, so I would trust reasonably heavy camera packages on it. Another issue to consider when weighing which rig to buy, although harder to tell via pictures and spec sheets, is how the weight of a sled is distributed. For instance, my M1 is a heavier sled than an Archer is, and so for the same camera payload, and number of batteries, my M1 will not be extended as far as the Archer would be. Post extension, especially at really long lengths, is one of the main causes of camera vibrations (which are a big, big issue, and have gotten many operators fired, including myself!). So if you are flying heavy camera packages every day, getting the biggest, beefiest rig you can makes sense, so that you're flying it within its comfort zone, rather than flying a lighter rig at the end of its useful range. I hope this helps in your selection!
    6 points
  10. Hi Donald, You’re right to assume that the answer is quite variable, but there are some rough guidelines that may help. One of the things that I particularly like to do at a workshop is to have a student take their post hand off of the gimbal completely. (Obviously leaving the other hand on the gimbal grip - no need to go totally hands free!) Many new operators get frustrated by what they see as “the rig wobbling”, and yet the moment I ask them to take their hand off, the rig floats magically through space without a wobble. However, as they then see, the camera is now aimlessly drifting, and the frame usually sucks. But hey, it’s stable! What this immediately shows, however, is that every “wobble” is coming from your hand. So the trick is to apply the input you need to frame the shot, but only that much input. There are times where you will need to apply more input - like stops and starts of a move, and there will be times where you need to apply less input, like a very slow consistent speed move. But the challenge of Steadicam is always applying just enough input to the sled. So, as to how that relates to pressure on the gimbal. The general rule of thumb I’ve found is that it’s almost always on the light side. Times when you need to apply more pressure would be when doing a tilt with a heavier drop time, or when counteracting violent stops and starts with a bottom heavy rig, or when changing directions mid-move. Apart from that, applying as little pressure as possible is the name of the game, as the tighter you are holding onto the gimbal, the more likely you are to make the rig wobble, or throw off the horizon, or cause pan wiggles. As for keeping the horizon level, that comes with practice, but there are a few additional tricks there. First of all, if you can, there are many new tools that can provide assistance for horizon as you’re operating (such as the Wave and Volt). While I think it’s important to learn how to operate without those tools, they have given a lot of operators the freedom to remove chasing the horizon from their attention loop while operating, and that’s incredibly freeing. It also takes away what was always one of the curses of Steadicam - it’s the only tool we regularly use on set which goes off level easily - so it makes it much easier for Steadicam work to blend in and be less obvious, something I know I appreciate. As for tricks without those fancy horizon aids, think about the blocking of your shots to avoid having to change direction unexpectedly. Every time you change direction or speed in the side to side axis, you introduce a tendency for the rig to go off level, and you will have to fight that. By blocking shots that limit these speed and direction changes, you limit the amount of times that you’ll need to be absolutely perfect. In addition, I run with a set of grid lines on my monitor, and regularly check them to the vertical and horizontal lines of the set. I also run a “CineLevel”, which is an acceleration compensated digital level that mounts on my rig, and seems rather effective at giving me a horizon readout, and it is relatively inexpensive, which is a pleasant surprise! Finally, and I’m sure others will echo this - if you haven’t, please find time to take a workshop or some private training from a reputable operator (and of those two options, I really recommend the workshop if you’re starting out, for a variety of reasons). While there is much you can learn on your own, and from videos and books, having experienced operators around you, critiquing you, and building your form is invaluable. In addition, there is a ton of nuance to how each individual operator crafts their shots, and handles their rig, and being around a group of extremely talented people gives you tons of people to “borrow” ideas and techniques from, and will vastly broaden your skill set in a very short period of time. If you can logistically and financially make it make sense, the SOA provides some of the best workshop experiences I’ve ever seen, and I’ve been lucky to be able to instruct there a few times.
    5 points
  11. I disagree. Keep the Volt. Practice like hell without it, but there is zero point in risking a minor horizon flub when on a real job. The point is to get the shot, and get it well. Who cares how on the day? It's your career and reputation for getting the shot, being efficient, artistic, pleasant to work with... and the Volt will only help you.
    5 points
  12. I think post length should be altered to get the specific shot - either to change the lens height range and/or the rig's inertia. Choosing to configure your sled only one way is like playing 10 keys on the piano instead of all 88.
    5 points
  13. Speaking of New Kid(s) On The Block and Steadicam...this was a long cold night 25 yrs ago.
    5 points
  14. Hello All, I'm happy to finally announce we are officially launching the latest 1.7 Volt Firmware. Thank you to Larry McConkey & Steve Wagner for all the work they put into helping us make this firmware what it is. Look in the video description on how to proceed w/ getting the update. In the video, it shows the changes that we made in the update to help you understand what the volt is doing in Regular & Sticky mode. If you received a Volt since July 2020 you'll have the latest 1.7 firmware already installed on your control box.
    5 points
  15. Many years ago I was on a show and this exact thing was happening all the time .Like Cedric I was using 2 magic arms and for most setups was quick and easy .My assistant presented me with this embroiled velcro backed slogan .I now use the SOS plate and it works great .
    5 points
  16. How many of you can find old Steadicam stuff in the closet like this? Evolution of Steadicam test fixtures from the mid 70’s through Steadicam III. The first one was used from early Steadicam. The second was the one I built in order to build and test the Steadicam II electronics. The third was for the Steadicam III circuit boards.
    5 points
  17. I've been holding off on saying much, as I know many who've gone the Volt route who I don't want to discourage, but I've had a very different experience than many with the Volt and the Wave. My experience with the Volt was that while it did offer some immediate advantages over the Wave (like its size and weight, and also the added bonus of having a rig that is neutrally balanced and thus can be moved around without any pendulum effects), it significantly changed my operating, and not for the better. I do a lot of tilting in my operating (something I wasn't aware of until I switched to the Volt), and the M1V electronics altered the way tilt felt, which required a lot of retraining, and additionally, I always saw a little pan wobble at the beginning and ends of tilts, no matter how much I turned the tilt strength down. There was also the issue (that I'm hoping eventually gets fixed) of the M1V tilting on a diagonal, and not in a straight vertical line, amongst a few other things that I found over my year and a half with the device. The work I did with the Volt was simply not as clean or good as the work I could do with the Wave, so I have since moved back to the Wave and sold my Volt. I urge each operator who is moving towards any augmented stabilization technology to try using both (and make sure they are both set up correctly, as many do not balance the Wave correctly), and see what they prefer, and most importantly, to analyze the footage critically.
    5 points
  18. Ha, I guess this is why we should mark items as sold. Someone just contacted me about this 17 years later!
    4 points
  19. Just remember folks, it is not just the weight, but the weight distribution that influences the "feel." Spread your masses to add pan inertia and you'll likely much prefer it.
    4 points
  20. Selling my G70X Arm. Located in Denmark. Includes bag and rain covers. €7660 / $8500
    4 points
  21. I thought I’d take a moment to share little bit of history which might be fun. Scrounging through some really old photographs I came across a couple of beauties dating back to around 1989. As aged as they appear, they indicate a counterculture that was taking root as Cinema Products struggled to understand the needs of the Steadicam Operator. While still living in South Africa, I met some aeronautical engineers whose day job was designing the Heads Up Display for the Rooivalk Attack Helicopter. As the technologies that applied to Steadicam covered some common ground, it seemed like a good place to start. I explained some of the quirks that we endure with the Steadicam, particularly its desire to depart perfect level when in the hands of a faltering and inadequate operator. As a member of that club, I pitched the idea of a cradle coupled with level sensors and a stepper motor that would take away our pain. It took a few months and these photos are the only evidence of what we came up with. It was a rough prototype but mechanically it worked pretty well as long as I kept the post travelling from left to right. The hitch in the giddy-up was the processing speed along with the level sensors of the time. As a concept it was limited, but the best sensor of that era, which might have improved our chances and which were probably only the equivalent of the sensor that was put in the very first iPhone, would have cost us around $18,000. If I remember correctly, it worked on the basis of a harmonic or acoustic signal that would distort as it departed level. After playing with the prototype for a while, it was clear that we had a long way to go. When I arrived in the USA and got into similar discussions with George Paddock, the challenge seemed more achievable. We were sadly humbled as we endured however. It is one thing to produce a rough prototype, but to consider putting it out to the world is another thing completely. Over the years we tried three times to launch the project but each time we encountered another problem and I have to say that the cash required was somewhat daunting. In a strange way, I was divided between the elegance and exclusiveness that lived within the Steadicam, while at the same time trying to create what amounted to be both a shortcut and a crutch. One of our attempts was in the era of Lynn Nicholson’s development of the Alien, and with the amount of money he had already invested, we felt that it would be underhand and deceptive to proceed with a vaguely similar concept. A group of us had been invited to a private demonstration of the Alien in a motel room near Universal and essentially Lynn demonstrated that he had solved the challenge of Camera Orientation according to planet earth. As the years past and the dust settled, we took one more stab at it and agreed to call it a day. It started to feel like we were in conflict our initial intention of keeping the PRO simple, clean and beautiful. I kept these two photographs which I carried with me when I settled in the USA on the off chance then I would find myself in a complicated conversation regarding the origination of the idea and the tricky issue of “Prior Art”. That may have been astute but as the years passed it became redundant. I'm also including in this collection a particular design that George and I approached along the way. We came to the conclusion that the arc of the leveling system actually needed to run in the inverse of what was conventional. When we mounted a camera and wore the Steadicam, we fully understood in about 2 seconds the concept of a mechanical system that has become un- coupled. That has to be one of my strangest Steadicam sensations I’ve ever felt, and thousands of dollars lay at our feet. It was with a certain amount of whimsy that I watched Chris Betz so elegantly achieve what had eluded myself and George for so long. It is one thing to tinker with prototypes, but to bring a product as complicated as the WAVE to a fickle and demanding market is a sign of incredible perseverance and fortitude. When George and I ran out of gas, others were better equipped to embrace the emerging technologies. What may have been telling, is that throughout the years we never came up with a name for it. The future is now saturated with camera stabilization that we couldn’t even imagine back in the 80’s and 90’s. Ironically, no matter how much technology is brought to bear, the best results still emerge from a neutrally balanced system and Garrett’s fingerprints can be found throughout.
    4 points
  22. From Ted’s manual of style...always a great idea to charge per minute, or even per foot moved. More for stairs. They can’t afford low mode.
    4 points
  23. 25 years ago today, Ted Churchill died. For those of us who knew him it was a painful day and time in our personal lives and in our careers. For those who knew of him back then, it was a shocker and made them want to know more. There will be links coming in here that will provide nuance and detail and some incredible clips and videos of him. As Garrett Brown has often said, " I invented the Steadicam. Ted invented the Steadicam Operator ". Hope you're resting in peace, Teddy.
    4 points
  24. To those who missed my Chocolate Lab, Harley. Meet our new two month old Black Lab. This is Lillie. She will be excited to meet you!
    4 points
  25. We work in a world where being seen in a reflection is bad, and for live operators the need is to remain as unobtrusive as possible. And providing the least amount of distraction to the actors. Anything but black is unprofessional, in my opinion.
    4 points
  26. Hi Josh, I remember being in your shoes clearly - it was the late summer of 2012, I was on my first feature film, having operated “semi-professionally” for about a year, and on two occasions I had to either put the 85mm up, or do a shot on the 50mm in low mode, and I remember both being seemingly impossible. So, you’re not alone in the difficulty of doing long lens work on Steadicam when starting out! I’d say about 1/4 of my work is tighter than a 50mm. Generally I don’t see many lenses above 135mm (though I have from time to time), although especially when doing anamorphic, 135mm is a pretty typical lens, and I regularly fly 100mm spherical lenses. A 65mm or 75mm is a sweet lens for Steadicam, and if you can get well in-sync with your actors, you can produce some truly beautiful tracking shots. I’d say to get to the point where I was completely unafraid of long lenses took me about 3 years of operating, and probably about 5 years to actually be able to back up my big talk with the skills to really pull it off. I will say that with long lenses, not only is it a technique issue, but it is also a physical feat with your body, and there is a significant component that the quality of your rig plays. When I upgraded my rig after that first feature, one of the biggest things I noticed in going to a new gimbal was that there had been some friction and play in my previous gimbal that just destroyed any chance of precision in long lens operating. Even the slightest friction in your gimbal will translate your body’s movements into the lens, and those errors will become much more pronounced on longer lenses. The same goes for your arm, although to a lesser degree (as the issues will be translational rather than angular). Additionally, having your rig trimmed for the tilt you will be holding is crucial, as is keeping your speed consistent. If you’re holding pressure with your hand to hold tilt, any little twitches and tremors in your hand will get into the frame, and if you’re speeding up and slowing down, any pendular swing of the sled will also get in, unless you’re good enough to keep 100% of it out (which very few are, although I think we all hope to get close!). And biggest of all, relax! I even get called out on this by DPs I’ve worked with for a long time. If I’m tense, that tends to telegraph into the shot, and sometimes I just need to take a deep breath and shake out my hands and try again. I hope that helps and gives you a few things to think about! Best of luck on your adventures!
    4 points
  27. A suggestion - Greek out everything already showing on the vest and then don't add anything to attract more attention to yourself.
    4 points
  28. My list of features on the M2 follows - Alas, the final specs for weight and min and max lengths, and of course, the pricing, are not done. Some post-NAB tweaks are in the works, and I believe Tiffen will announce it all officially by CineGear, if not sooner. M2 highlights Overall Lightweight, stiff, modular, 12/24v + 3rdbattery, integral Volt electronics, Volt ready gimbal, +/– tilt head, 3x HDSDI lines. G-50X companion sled. Modularity Stage, base, and posts are fully interchangeable with M1 components, both mechanically and electronically. Stage features Very low profile Large size, longer dovetail plate, updated hole pattern Tool-free dovetail plate lock and release, identical to M1 Integral Volt “brain” electronics inside stage (optional feature) 3x HDSDI ports, 2x Lemo power ports, tally connector, 2x P-taps +/– 10 degree tilt head Post systems Standard 2 post system Shorter 2 post system Also available with M1’s 2 and 3-stage post systems Gimbal High precision bearings Volt ready Integrated Volt encoder ring Tool-free post clamp Handle for .500, .625, or .740 arm posts Monitor mount to center post Tool-free, solid design Clamp lever for height adjustment Inserts for different post sizes 15mm rods on 60mm centers Monitor Universal monitor mount Choice of many monitors Base 3x HDSDI connectors 2x Power port Monitor port Low profile Integral 3rdbattery mount (optional) Dovetail base (optional) Cheeseplate base (optional) Battery mount 2x IDX or AB (IDX mount now with battery release protectors) Switchable 12/24 volts 3rd battery on/off switch 12 volt P-taps on each battery USB power tap
    4 points
  29. They are Klixon breakers, available from Aircraft Spruce, an aircraft parts supplier. They’re not cheap, but here they are. I’ve also gotten them from Peerless Electronics. https://m.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/elpages/klixon7277.php?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIitPVhbb93wIViorICh0fXQBIEAQYAiABEgIy2vD_BwE I’ve used the 7277-2-# series, where that last number is the ampacity.
    4 points
  30. What an outstanding shot .Here is a BTS and Peter talking about the shot .Enjoy
    4 points
  31. Hi everyone Here is a interview with Larry McConkey talking about the Copa shot enjoy Louis Puli Goodfellas BTS copy 2.pdf
    4 points
  32. Selling my Steadicam Aero 30 System, great condition, very well looked after and maintained. Location: Bristol, UK. Price: £5500 Collection preferred, willing to ship at buyers expense. Whats Included: - Steadicam Aero 30 Sled - Steadicam Aero 30 Arm - Steadicam Zephyr Vest - Steadicam Aero 30 monitor - Steadicam V-lock battery plate x2 - Steadicam docking bracket - Steadicam low mode bracket - Custom monitor yoke - Peli Storm IM2950 Case with custom foam - Steadicam vest bag - Steadicam arm bag - Steadicam sled bag - Pixapro heavy duty c-stand - Counterweights x8 - Smallrig 15mm rail baseplate - Smallrig 15mm rail clamp - Smallrig 15mm rails x2 - SDI cable x2 - Monitor power cable - 4pin XLR to D-tap cable - D-tap to 3x D-tap cable - Tiffen vest screws x4
    3 points
  33. Includes transmitter, receiver, all entennas, ac power supply, several D Tap to lemo power cables and bnc cables. Works great, just not the range of newer models. $1700 OBO. 859F71DF-B42B-4143-B2B9-1F2531510C9A_1_201_a.heic
    3 points
  34. Yeah, what do you know about steadicam, Jerry?... ... mmm what?... ooooh.... wait...
    3 points
  35. I guess that all depends on how short you are and how high you need to go. But yes, I often use a long arm post. Arm posts longer than 12" are frowned upon, based on strength. I'll try to raise to socket block maybe but really how much does that gain if your torso isn't all that long. Depending on the height one needs, one may need to do one or the other or a combo. My point is being dead set on one set up is limiting to what one can achieve as an operator. Personally, I think it makes one less versatile in a world where shots are never the same.
    3 points
  36. Here's a great modification from Cramped Attic. Betz Top stage with PRO outputs built into the top stage eliminating the junction box. Reducing the distance between the camera and gimbal by almost an inch. Makes perfect sense as long as you don't need more than two camera power outputs. David Hable is a genius at modifications. He's performed several design and modifications for me.
    3 points
  37. We have all been in that situation. It’s hard to speak up but if it’s hurting you say something. Another solution to shooting off the stand is using a vehicle mount on a dolly or bazooka. They you have the arm to make corrections/boom etc.
    3 points
  38. Here's another one of David Hable's masterpieces. He modified my Wave to provide power outlets and BNC's as well as a back-lit bubble level. Now the camera sits 2inches lower minus the weight of the Dbox and topstage. I use the XCS side-to-side plate in the Wave for balance within the Wave. I have side-to-side adjustment on my monitor for Sled balance. The sled was a PRO Lite that has been upgraded to HD and the 2inch post and gimbal are MK-V. It's a fantastic rig that had become my pre-pandemic work horse. The loss of weight and height between the gimbal and wave allows me to keep the sled compact and tight to my body. I love it! David is such an innovative problem solver. There isn't much you can throw at him that he can't adapt.
    3 points
  39. Hi all; I'm not sure where this post will lead but I'm trying to help those who may be young and new to the Movie business think about things they haven't before... This will and can cover a hundred different turns considering we're all in this new world of pandemic business shut down all the way to new trends in the industry. Here's my thinking that I've looked at for a long time and being older than most of you I've seen how the industry and business in every way has changed. Changes (to name a few). 1) Pandemic, who hasn't thought about money and when they'll get back to work? 2) Savings, who really has enough and wished they had more? 3) Savings, if you had it and spent it, how are you going to get it back now? 4) The time between jobs may and is longer. (about 5 more but that's a good start). So, I'm going to lob out some ideas that many will say, "I can't do that because when I'm on a show, I'm already working 80 hr weeks." So this may not work for them but for those others who are not there. Ideas; 1) part time job, way under your skill level that you can get THIS WEEK. No big training, no big pay expected. Hotel, anything, kitchen, housekeeping, whatever? Restaurant, landscaping, etc. you pick it. Why? $10-12 an hour. Hotel, (example) you do weekends? $100 a weekend. $400 a week 5k a yr. Employee discounts on travel, now you can do family vacation for half price, $400 a month you buy stocks and you have a savings account you didn't have before. Now you have an extra 5k for hours that don't really matter, you learn some new stuff I guarantee; even if its about how hard the rest of the world works that spend a lifetime at $10 an hour but I'm sure a lot more too. But now your vacations cost you half.... big savings. Other perks, I have done some and I walk out with the donate/discard stuff and drop it at the local Goodwill and get a tax deduction!!! There are some other savings too... Ideas, think about it.... Maybe this becomes a retirement fund which you never had before? Is there a down side to having an extra 5k a yr? After a few years maybe this becomes the down payment for a house? You wouldn't have had it any other way? "I can't do that job?" Why not? I personally did a landscaper cashier job last summer on the weekends. I learned a bunch, one guy 50+ worked his butt off every day, then I learned later, after work, doing intense days would go to the gym afterwards and walk on the treadmill for another hour. He was made of iron. Compartmentalize money, think about it this way if you want, 'The money I make here, pays my insurance and utilities for a year and now the pressure is off for my other income.' What I'm hoping is you all start thinking about this in ways many of us have thought beneath us and it really can work in many ways. Lastly, I read a lot of the want ads on Indeed and one came up for garbage man/person, it said things like "must be able to get in and out of truck 500-600 times a day and lift 50-80lbs etc." That's a tough life and wouldn't that get you in shape. Last thing I remember about garbage people was they got 100% insurance coverage in the last contract... Every job has some perks that we don't know about, use that money to stay humble and learn and make some money that may pave the way to a savings account you would not have had if you hadn't worked so hard for it. (We all want to make products we can sell but that takes time to get going, this is instant and you can still do those too...) Ideas, look at them. Janice
    3 points
  40. Buy & Sell in the SteadicamForum.com Marketplace at your Own Risk. If you receive an email that looks like it's from SteadicamForum.com, make sure the web links in the email are exactly SteadicamForum.com, not something similar. Scammers can make a web site that looks just like SteadicamForum.com but is a fake. If you log in to their fake forum, they'll have your real forum login and can hack your account here on the real forum. If you are tricked into clicking the link the scammer will steal your forum login, change your forum password and email address, and impersonate you in the forum. They will use your account to send out fake login emails to other forum members and try to hack their accounts too. If you are considering buying from a forum member, please please please do some research and make sure they are who they say they are before you send anyone funds, even if they are a long-time forum member. A long time member's account may have been compromised by an impostor. Any legitimate seller or buyer will be happy to provide you with real information. Scammers typically just try to make the sale quickly without answering any complicated questions. Don't rush it. Call the person on the phone and talk in detail about the item and transaction details. Make sure they know what they're talking about. If they're the seller, have them immediately text you photos of the item that you can tell are current. Ask them to pose in the picture. Use a payment method that includes fraud protection. Don't use PayPal's "Gift" option which does not offer any protection. Do not use a bank transfer to send money. Bank transfers are not reversible and do not offer buyer protection. Change your forum password. Use the forum's Two Factor Authentication feature. This protects your account from being compromised. Be safe.
    3 points
  41. Hi Kevin, What rig and arm are you working with? Everyone has their way of doing things. Try this. Super light touch with your operating hand when keeping your frame. If the rig is balanced correctly trust that it will stay that way with out you overcompensating with your operating hand. Arm hand can be as firm as you like. Footsteps should roll. Not flat feet of course. I operate regular. Walking forward I tend to have very short strides. Rolling from my left heel to my toe and then onto the outside of my right foot rolling onto my right heel. Then back to my left foot and so on. Backwards, it is simply rolling from my toes to my heels. Harder to explain than to physically show this sort of thing. I hope what I wrote is clear. If not, please let me know.
    3 points
  42. Pristine condition Tiffen M1 rig with Volt system. *Flat (equals rock solid) M1 topstage. *M1 Camera Dovetail Plate (unused/as new). *Two stage 1.75” M1 Centerpost. *M1 Gimbal with Volt. *Volt Control cable. *Volt Sensor Box Power cable. *Volt Sensor Box and attachment bracket. *M1 Monitor Mount (monitor not included). *M1 lower Junction Box and dual battery plate. *Eight IDX V mount batteries. *One IDX simultaneous Quad Charger. *Tiffen Volt Docking Bracket. *Spare Volt motor belt. *Spare Volt Sensor Box Power Cable. *Spare Encoder Sensor. *Case for M1 Volt Rig. *Case for Batteries and Charger. Price for all: $25,500 US. Buyer pays shipping (shipping account preferred). This rig has been fantastic. The only reason for selling is that i just received my M2 Volt. Serious inquiries only. More photos available. Email only please. I don’t always check the forum. Grayson Grant Austin, SOC graysonaustin@me.com
    3 points
  43. Hi Kevin, Height differences are always challenging. Think about what lens you're on, and figure out the distance you need to be from both actors/actresses to maintain your desired composition. Also think about being able to hold them if you're going around corners, and whether or not losing sight of them for a few moments is okay or not - a good conversation to have with DP and/or director. A tight two shot typically isn't very aesthetically pleasing if one head is at the bottom of frame and one is at the top, or your whole frame is dutched to get both, but as with everything else, it depends on the story you're trying to tell. Maybe low mode is a better choice because you see more of the upper wall behind them and notice a picture on the wall that's important to the story that you'd miss in high mode. Experiment and see what feels right to you for what you're trying to convey in the shot. Happy flying! Lisa
    3 points
  44. It is with mixed emotions that I write this note to tell the Forum that I am officially hanging up my steadicam after 23 long years. Being a steadicam operator has opened the door to countless opportunities I never dreamed I’d be able to participate in. While I began my feature steadicam career with Roger Corman, I currently work with three Oscar winning DP’s, two Oscar nominated DP’s, and the rest of my resume is filled with ASC member DP’s. I’ve had several MTV music videos of the year (back when those were still shown on MTV), many Super Bowl commercials, several successful big-budget movies, and overall, I’ve been very, very fortunate in my career, and the steadicam is what allowed me to get there. I’ve thought long and hard about this decision, as it has been at the back of my mind for the past two years. I injured my back for the second time in early 2015 - a repeat of a herniated disc injury I first suffered in 2011. The second occurrence was pretty bad, and I was out of work for eight months while I tried everything to get healthy (physical therapy, acupuncture with cupping and electricity, epidural shots, chiropractic, ultrasound, whole body cryotherapy, sensory deprivation (floating), tens machine sessions, etc.). While I eventually regained my health and went on to operate on several more projects with the rig, I began to wonder if the next injury might be more permanent, and if I was doing myself a disservice by continuing. I found myself watching the blocking of a scene and hoping the actors didn’t start walking down the hallway, or alley, so that I wouldn’t need to put on the vest. I began to not enjoy picking it up anymore, being far more content to ride the dolly, hop on the remote head controls for the crane, or put the camera on my shoulder. It was time to make a change in my life, as it became apparent that the only reason I was still doing it was the fear of moving on, and the money I’d be losing by shifting to regular operating. In the end, I realized that while a change in occupation can be scary, I wasn’t going to let that fear define me. While I enjoy a payroll or rental check as much as the next guy, that was never the overriding factor in my life, and I figured it was better to be happy and healthy, then have a few more dollars and be miserable. The job is too damn hard if you don’t love what you are doing. There have been many things to love about this occupation. The relationships with fellow operators is unique, in that you compete for jobs, yet still go out of your way to help your fellow man. I’ve tried to be as helpful as I know how to be with fellow operators in need of loaner gear or advice, because the operators who came before me treated me that way. On what was a big commercial for me at the time, my sled went out while shooting a Disney World spot in San Pedro. Everyone I knew was working and unavailable to help, so I called Joe Broderick, who I only knew by reputation, and who didn’t know me at all. Joe responded by driving 80 miles round trip to deliver his sled to me from Burbank, and then refused to take any money for it. The opportunity to do a job that is both physical and creative is unique. While we sweat and endure while carrying the rig - sometimes with legs and back muscles quivering, there is a real artistic side to the craft that is addictive. Designing shots that tell a story is the huge reward that comes with working with talented directors and DP’s that either know how to move the camera in space, or trust you enough to listen to your suggestions. Once the basic path from A to B is established, it is our job to finesse it, and take it to another level so that it isn’t mechanical and enhances the story the script is trying to tell. The best operators in the world - like Larry McConkey and Chris Haarhoff make this sort of thing look easy, and the nuance and subtlety in their frames speaks volumes. During my time on set, I’ve have many strange and wonderful things happen: I had Madonna tell me “Don’t fucking hit me with that thing” when I first met her on her “Ray of Light” video. I had Harrison Ford embrace me from behind during an entire take while doing a close-up of Viola Davis: when we cut and I spun around to look at him, Harrison told me “Just fucking with you kid”. I had Ben Stiller repeatedly yell at me over his voice of God PA system while he was directing Tropic Thunder. My favorite of those moments had me up to my knees in a Hawaiian river, while Ben started yelling at me to push into a close up on Robert Downey Jr. I couldn’t push because there was a large boulder in my path that blocked the way. I could hear Ben ask John Toll (while still on the PA) “Why the fuck isn’t your operator pushing in?” Still rolling, I tilted the camera down to show the huge boulder that stood in the path between the camera and Downey, and after a pause, Ben said in a somewhat defeated voice over the PA system “Oh…”. Karma can be a bitch, and after our move back to LA, we were doing a scene with Matthew McConaughey playing an agent. In agent’s office, Ben had placed several of his personal items, including some of his Star Trek memorabilia. He had Spock’s ears, Spock’s shirt, and the head of the Gorn in a custom Plexiglas case, from when Captain Kirk fought it at Vasquez Rocks. There was a security guard that blocked the doorway to the set the entire day so nobody would steal Ben’s prized possessions. The on-set dresser went to move the Gorn head when we turned around and picked it up by the Plexiglas. The wood bottom that held the head dropped out of the bottom, and fell to the floor, where it rolled around a bit, while small pieces of 1960’s rubber fell off the head. Whoops! I did a commercial for the Spice Channel where we filmed an entire day of simulated sex. In the last “scene”, the director insisted that he walk with me and look over my shoulder at my monitor as I circled the bed with a couple, including a man who was not what most would consider anatomically correct. The director kept whispering in my ear “Tilt down to the cock”…I learned that day that if you ever hear those words whispered by another man in your ear, you are not in a good place in your career. I once asked Colin Firth if he could help me out with a shot. When he walked into the front door of the house, I needed him to set his briefcase down on an apple box instead of an off-screen bench, as that would allow him to stay nicely composed in the frame instead of leaning partially out of it. Colin turned to me and replied “I quite liked it when actors leave the frame” and turned his back and walked back out the door. We put the next wider lens on the camera. I was asked to do a shot from on top of an elephant marching in a parade. The DP (who also operated the A camera) had done a camera test while riding the elephant during the prep and quickly decided that he didn’t want anything to do with it, so up I went. Thankfully, our camera team rented an EasyRig, as I was stranded on top of the elephant for 20 or 30 minutes, and my legs hurt so badly when I came down that I could hardly walk – all from clenching them tightly around the beast so I wouldn’t fall off as she walked and I balanced the camera on my shoulder. I did a commercial at Vasquez Rocks where I followed a running monkey into the tent of an anthropologist. On three consecutive takes, the monkey ran into the tent, jumped on the desk, stood up on his hind legs and urinated in the face of the actor seated at the desk - priceless. Lastly, I got called to do a Prince video where we finished the day in his bedroom. I was handheld on his bed with a completely nude actress who was touching herself, while lesbian porn was projected on the wall of his room. At some point, the actress turned to Prince (who was directing the video while wearing pajamas that, depending on how the light hit them, were see-through) and asked him “How is this ever going to be in the video?” Prince laughed and told her “Oh baby, we’re gonna fuzz it”, to which she said “Okay”, and continued. I never imagined anything like this happening when I was a sophomore in high school in Montana and Purple Rain was racing up the charts. There are many, many more, but then we all have stories. For the first 14 years of my career, I did primarily music videos and commercials once I got past my low-budget movie phase. Once I started to do big feature films, I started keeping a daily journal of the key points that happened during the day. I have these for every movie I’ve done, and it makes for interesting reading before the movie comes out. It allows me to remember the little things that were funny, hazardous, or amusing, as so many of these moments get lost over the years. I would encourage those out there reading this to do the same, as it is a great reminder and memento of the hard work that goes into making two hours of entertainment. I was so excited when I got my first sled from Derrick Whitehouse. It was a Cinema Products model 2 that had been sitting unused in a closet at a university, and I had Bob Derose spend about 6 weeks modifying it – which was time that I didn’t have it to practice. When I finally got the sled, it was awesome, but it took me a long while before I became proficient at it. My first 35mm job was for Roger Corman, and my buddy Steve Adelson got me the gig when he was double-booked. It took me about 45 minutes to balance the Arriflex BL2 as it was very motor side heavy. My first 35mm shot involved 3 or 4 people exiting a helicopter and walking towards me for a long way across a field. When they stopped, they had a minute-long conversation at an Army tent. My previous work had been in 16mm with Arri SR’s, and the weight of the BL2 crushed me from the start. On take one, the actors started out nicely composed, but soon I was cutting the outside two actors in half vertically. I then scrambled to get wider, which resulted in a head to toe frame. I knew I was fucking up, but there was nothing I could do about it, because despite my brain knowing what needed to happen, my legs were exhausted and had a mind of their own, and refused to listen to my persistent urging. None of the subsequent takes were much better, and I knew I was going to get fired. When they called lunch, I went and sat by myself, thinking that when it happened, at least I wouldn’t be sitting by others. Out of the corner of my eye, I could see the DP get up, and approach me. Oh shit. He put a hand on my shoulder, and casually said that he liked my work, and asked if I was interested in working more days on the film! I wish I could think of his name now…hard to imagine anyone liking those early frames - must have been the poor UHF transmission from my Modulus 2000 into my tiny 7” black and white monitor (my first consumer monitor/TV also had am/fm radio!). Thankfully, I got a little better with time. Thanks for listening. Good luck to all of you - especially those just starting out on your journey. If you work hard, it can take you to amazing heights. Just remember to respect the gear and what it can do over time to your body - doing this job is like being a professional athlete (those who know me would never accuse me of that, perhaps that was part of my problem), and a career that involves this kind of physicality can be shorter than normal jobs. Stay in shape, and stay strong. If nothing else, it will help with longevity, in a career that often values the mindset and experience of age, but the body of youth. I will be selling off both of my XCS rigs in the next few weeks and months, as well as numerous other items (rickshaw, hands-free Segway, etc). I’ll post items on the Forum once I’ve had time to have them all checked out and done some research regarding pricing. I hope they bring their new owners as much as they’ve brought me. All the best, and thanks to all for over two decades of fond memories and comradery. I’ve learned a lot from this Forum, and I feel like I know a lot of you from your posts. Keep up the great work, and I hope to see some of you on set now that I'm not carrying the rig any longer. Brooks Robinson
    3 points
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