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  1. Due to my narssitic personality and the eagerness to share. I've decided to copy/paste my NB arm findings from Facebook group to here. so it could be archived since there is a great chance more pro arm users will chime in and start a good argument, but i guess its all personal preference in the end. I've found latex rubber to be quite a breakthrough upgrade compare to all spring arms and here are my findings below. I've sold my pro arm and used the same amount of money to get a g70x and NB arm thinking I would use g70x indoor and NB arm outdoor. With a thought that NB arm has sealed bearings and I could treat it like trash. But now I don't even pullout g70x anymore. I've used PRO arm exclusively for 8 full years, working 12 month a year, been through all senarios, fast and slow. No budget student folms to $40 mil USD budget. Was prasing pro equipment cuz "all feature guys uses PRO" kinda fan boy mindset , pretty similar to the panavision fanboys. But eventually as years gone by I've developed critical thinking and below are a couple points why I prefer NB over the other arms. 1. Sweet spot. As an somewhat experienced op you might have noticed pro arm is only truly good at the middle 10% of boom range, and you tune the arm up or down offset this spot based on the height of the shot required. Part of the reason people need to get XCS mid arm swivel. But g70x is better here since it could support your lens height with the ISO adjustment. NB arm or X arm is the same ish feeling with pro. Meaning force required to hold the lens height But is better at the job due to less friction and rubber vs spring nature. More to elaborate below 2. Boom range . Pro arm has 60cm. And NB has 83cm. As an average 176cm/5"10 Asian male I have no monkey arms. But I still run out of boom range on pro arm quite often. I've bought the IBaird / mid arm swivel / Klassen vest that offers a shit load of range options to counter this issue but I still wish the pro has more in the first place. Like from standing to seating. I always bottom out on pro arm, or I'm too low at standing. NB arm on the other hand. Offers just enough. Alrhough it's not as effortless to hold camera height on both extreme side of the range, but none of the other arms does. Good thing is that U can't bottom out the NB like pro. And u can't hit the eng stop easily. So even if you use your finger tips to get the camera height there, u still can't hit the stop when u take a step. Side note, G70x is only iso in the middle 60%. Outside that you are fighting the same as all other arms. 3. Friction. All spring arms including g70x and pro have more frictions than rubber arms like xarm or NB. For pro, the each canister has two "ears" that cling and hinges on a groove on the chassis. And no matter how u deny it. It's not as smooth compare to NB or x arm, especially both of them has sealed bearings and rubber bands. This helps emensively at ultra slow movements, so slow that the shot shouldve been done on a slider. But they have to put you on steadicam cuz it "saves time". I'm not as vocal as a lot of operators out there. Mostly just nod my head and do it. So rubber arms help a shit ton here. There are countless times when I have to manually hold the sled in the same height countering the up and down from the pro arm. It's very minor, and I have to walk so perfectly. It's doable. But not everyday with every senario. If there is even a bit of terian and you aren't feeling it that day. You are mostly screwed. Still end up with a ok ish shot, but not good enough to be called "bleeding dolly". So having a rubber arm here helps sooo much. Even g70x is better than pro due to the iso adjustments 4. Maintainence. I know guys would argue how you can water hose pro arm to clean. But NB arm is the next level. I don't even cover that arm in rain, it's fully sealed and u don't need give a damn about rubber bands. White lithium grease ? Why the hell you need that! I know a lot of you will argue how robust and solid the pro arm build is. Now look below for the trade off. Also by the way the robustness has nothing to do with the shot. So to me, it's useless feature. 5. Weight savings. Pro arm is 6kg/13lbs or so when I measured it with mid arm swivel and solid xcs post. While NB is at 3kg. This is almost the weight difference between Alexa mini and Alexa LF. And at times when u can't trim the sled down like Alexa 65. This becomes a huge deal to prolong your career and health. I know people would say "man up", but we are like atheles. We all have performance peak years and slope down since. So The more we can preserve the years the better. And hopefully have a healthy body to enjoy retirement life too. And this was the major tipping point for me to purchase an NB arm. But the performance of it blew my mind. 6. Tooless adjustments. NB arm uses latex rubber bands. I mainly just put 4-6 on my wrists as bracelet. And that's enough of a difference between a prime and a heavy zoom. I can do it on a fly. Without trying to find the hole on canisters like the pro arm. And since it's quite forgiving for filters and different primes. I dont even bother to add/remove the bands. It's quite fast. 7. Less parts. I was debating between x arm and NB arm when I was trying to get rid of the pro arm. But x arm is still 4.5kg while NB is 3kg. And NB has no cores to swap. And no spray needed to maintain the rubber bands like the x arm. And no wrench needed to tune the lift. And no rain over needed to work outside. For those who is wondering tension loss in cold, who cares. I just put on more bands. 8. Minimum weight requirement. I know pro has advised the minium is 13lbs with two blues only and NB is at 0. Also no sled is lighter than that. My argument here is , you don't have to know the approx weight of the sled to put the appropriate set of canisters. I've gone lazy through out the years and just settled with 2 blue and 2 black on pro arm. And just put more batteries on the sled to come up with the minimum. But there are times I wish I have all the adjustability without messing with canisters. Since bottoming out and fully loaded takes like 50 turns on each and it's quite some work to find the right fit between jobs or between prime / heavy zooms. The g70x and NB arm is simple as hell in comparison and I can do the best sled build always without worrying about canister combos. Or how ISO the arm is when canisters are fully loaded than minimum There is one thing pro arm is at best where all others are bad. that is the arm post spin feature. Pro is by far the most silkly smooth one while g70x is basically Fisher Price trash. NB has got some friction to it but it's usable. So if u fold in your gimbal handle more frequent than anything then no other arm is for you. I know many, if not all of you have witnessed the failing of the socket block on NB arm @cinegear quite a few years ago. And has been laughing at their quality. But the manufacture has fixed the issue and demoed the new design with Max load at worse senario and it helds. They deserve a chance, they always response to my emails in a matter of mins, and answers all my idiotic questions. That's way better than a lot of brands out there. And that includes weekend too which amazes me. Hope this sort of sums the majority of my reason of switch. It is quite seamless to switch from PRO, and no one has gone back the other way around. I'm not gonna use the big op names to convince you guys here. Cuz I fell for this "woo this big op uses this and it must be good" crap when I got the pro arm. But I'm More than happy to answer PM if you are more curious
    4 points
  2. I'm selling my Steadicam M1 System, including M1 Sled, M1 Volt Gimbal, G70X Arm, Ultravest and more. Everything is in great condition and perfect working order. Purchased in 2018, it hasn't been used a lot(one reason I'm selling it). I'm interested in selling as a complete package, or I can break it up as well. System includes the following: Steadicam M1 Sled, 2 section post with M1 Volt Gimbal, Tilt Head Stage, 8" Transvideo Monitor & Vmount Power G70x Arm Steadicam Ultravest Lowmode Bracket Mounting Bracket for M1 Volt Gimbal & Original M1 Gimbal Ultra Arm Protective Weather Cover 2 x Steadicam/Thermodyne hard cases for Sled and Vest/Arm respectively 4 x Dynacore 155 kWh Vmount with Powerbank Dual Charger Assorted Cables and Toolkit Asking Price for Full System: $33,500 Asking Prices for Individual Components: M1 Sled w/Volt Gimbal, Mounting Brackets, Lowmode bracket and Hard Case: $22,500 Tiffen G70x Arm with Bag & Weather Cover: $9,950 Tiffen Steadicam Ultravest: $2750 Arm & Vest Combo with Thermodyne Case: $12,000 Vmount Batteries with Powerbank Dual Charger: $400. Everything is priced to sell, and I'm not desperate to get rid of anything, so I'm not really interested in haggling. Buyer will also be responsible for Shipping charges. Pictures of the gear attached:
    4 points
  3. Hello everyone, I'm selling my Steadicam M2 Volt with a G70X arm and an Exovest. Everything is almost in brand new condition, with just few hours of use. Here's a list of the items: - Tiffen Steadicam M2 Volt ( 1.75 2- section post and 3 gold mount battery plates) - Tiffen Volt rain cover - Additional Tiffen Volt power cable - Tiffen M2 sled tools and accessories - Tiffen Volt docking bracket with accessories and original pouch - Transvideo Stargate HDR 7" - Transvideo soft cover and SDI cables - Tiffen Steadicam G70X Arm with accessories and original pouch - Tiffen Arm rain cover - Tiffen 12" Arm post - Tiffen Steadicam Fawcett Exovest with accessories and original case - Pelican iM2950 ( Steadicam Sled ) - Pelican 1650 ( Steadicam Arm and accessories ) - Inovativ AXIS stand with soft case - Inovativ AXIS set of wheels with pouches Total asking price: $70950 Every single item is on perfect condition. The Steadicam kit is on "goofy configuration", if you need it on "standard configuration" I can do it for you... Thanks !
    3 points
  4. Selling my steadicam rig ( Pro-line Raven ) -Pro-line Raven rig - 6,000 $ (45 pounds ) -Pro-line front mount vest - 1,500 $ -Basic arm came with the rig hold up to 70 pounds -DOCKING PORT -FeelWorld LUT7S 7" 3D LUT 4K HDMI and SDI Monitor / 2-yr warranty - 500 $ -Batteries ( Sold ) -Camera Power Cable - •1B-2pin 12v Proline Raven to Red DSMC2 Power cable, 30 / 1 X $235.00$ •Thin SDI Cable / 18", 24", 30" 3 x 100.00$ •12v regulated to power feelworld monitor, 1B-2pin Lemo for Proline Raven, 18" -180.00$ asking for 8,500$
    3 points
  5. Hope everyone on the forum is safe and healthy and doing well. If not, send me a message. Let’s talk. I’m no psychiatrist, but I’m happy to give an ear. All the best, Maxwel
    3 points
  6. Hey everyone, we couldn't find a universal dovetail plate for the new Alexa 35 and Arri's rig-specific versions aren't going to be out for a while, so we decided to make one! As Steadicam Ops, it's always frustrating to have to buy a new plate for every new camera, so we are offering a discounted pre-order for the community. If you are one of the few working with the camera early and need a plate, message me directly and we will try to get you one before they are released! Check it out at our website! https://apexcinemagear.com/products/arri-35-universal-stabilizer-plate?fbclid=IwAR3sWCWon8dRjAFpuTgFfoYaGn6mju63LNvECFGmvbO0u6jVeKnbtRIzNFk
    2 points
  7. Hello everyone! I have a setup for sale that’s practically brand new and not used much. - Archer2 System: Archer2 Sled with AB-Mount, With small hd dp7 Monitor. - LX Vest - G-50x Arm - Volt Control Box, Volt, Power Cable, Interconnect Cable, Docking Bracket - Screws and Washers all sealed nicely in a flight case! Recently all serviced at Tiffen and ready to go selling the package for 32k open to offers!
    2 points
  8. Buy & Sell in the SteadicamForum.com Marketplace at your Own Risk. If you receive an email that looks like it's from SteadicamForum.com, make sure the web links in the email are exactly SteadicamForum.com, not something similar. Scammers can make a web site that looks just like SteadicamForum.com but is a fake. If you log in to their fake forum, they'll have your real forum login and can hack your account here on the real forum. If you are tricked into clicking the link the scammer will steal your forum login, change your forum password and email address, and impersonate you in the forum. They will use your account to send out fake login emails to other forum members and try to hack their accounts too. If you are considering buying from a forum member, please please please do some research and make sure they are who they say they are before you send anyone funds, even if they are a long-time forum member. A long time member's account may have been compromised by an impostor. Any legitimate seller or buyer will be happy to provide you with real information. Scammers typically just try to make the sale quickly without answering any complicated questions. Don't rush it. Call the person on the phone and talk in detail about the item and transaction details. Make sure they know what they're talking about. If they're the seller, have them immediately text you photos of the item that you can tell are current. Ask them to pose in the picture. Use a payment method that includes fraud protection. Don't use PayPal's "Gift" option which does not offer any protection. Do not use a bank transfer to send money. Bank transfers are not reversible and do not offer buyer protection. Change your forum password. Use the forum's Two Factor Authentication feature. This protects your account from being compromised. Be safe.
    2 points
  9. Hi Alex. I'm still making cables, but at 72, I can't guarantee for how long. terrywest531@gmail.com
    2 points
  10. Did a little research because I didn't have anything else to do today. The original xBone was designed to work with the Eco, Klassen and I think Action Products vest. The xReach also works with the Exo vest and others. The xBone CF makes no mention of working with Exo (from the flowcine site) and couldn't find any information on an adaptor. Doesn't mean one doesn't exist or that flowcine couldn't make one.
    2 points
  11. Hi everyone! I always love perusing this site and reading about other ops journey and setups so I figured I’d finally give back a little and show my current set up. After years of being a gimbal op and hating how the ArmorMan 2 was on my body, as well as just the restriction of doorways and the absence of a good low-mode option, I finally pulled the trigger and got the SmartSystems Matrix sled with X1 arm…. And boy do I LOVE IT! I get the ergonomics and operability of a Steadicam with the roll control and smooth action of a gimbal. As well as being able to do some pretty crazy moves (with the execption of the trinity low to high jib mode in 1 shot - the tail gets in the way) + being able to switch to low mode in 15 seconds. :) Feel free to use this post to ask any questions of the setup or operation of it. I’m currently on a show that we are rocking the Venice + recorder + k35s + Preston … a 29lb camera package. With counter weights, the total sled comes in at 73lbs It’s a beast but with some workouts, smart operation, and taking care of my body, I’ve gotten exceptionally comfortable with it. We’re regularly doing 15-20 mins walk and talks + 100meter+ moves. It’s not for the faint of heart (or back) but neither is the Trinity or Omega. Happy operating and shooting!
    2 points
  12. This has been a back-up for a few years now. Don’t need 2 x Preston’s so it’s up for sale. Good condition, nicely packaged system. HU3, MDR2, 1xDM1, 1x DM2, accessories and cables…. Mail me for complete list. Priced to sell - 5700 euros firm. buyer pays shipping, I’m in Paris France.
    2 points
  13. Bump New Price! XCS Ultimate with 2'' post, non goofy (normal) ergo handle, Transvideo 6'' Cinemonitor, low profile monitor arm, XCS gimbal, Cinematic Precision ARRI Plate, CatGriller, XCS Docking Bracket and cables.. $10,500 (excl. shipping) A great deal for a great sled! Walter Klassen Flex Vest $2500
    2 points
  14. Asking for $17,000 or best offer. Arm comes with 4 blue canisters and 2 black canisters. I have installed the xcs mid swivel to allow for an even greater range for low and high mode uses. Comes with travel bag, rain cover, j bracket, 5/32 tool and spare parts and the canister bag for any unused canisters. I recently had the canisters all inspected by GPI, no issues and working at 100% I am the second owner of the arm, originally came with 2 blue + 2 black. I added two blue canisters NEW from GPI. The arm was bought in July 2019 - was only used for a year and half prior to my purchase. So the arm and original canisters have about 4 years of use in them. The newer 2 blue canisters only have about 2 and half years of use. XCS mid swivel was purchased NEW from XCS in February in 2020. Two years of use in it. Brand new, the arm + canisters would cost $18,200 and the XCS mid swivel new is $2,800. Brand new together they'd come out at $21,000. So that is a savings of $4,000. For now, i will NOT be splitting the mid swivel from the arm for this sale. I'm diversifying my camera gear holdings, and i currently own two steadicam arms - so I'm simply selling this one to make room for some other gear. Will ship domestic or intl, buyer pays shipping. Cahsier check, payment upfront. If buyer wishes, i can write up a contract to protect both myself and them. If you have any questions, please feel free to ask.
    2 points
  15. Just wanted to reach out to any of those out there that are on the hunt for an alternative monitor to the current choices. I recently bought direct from the manufacturer in Italy, "Smart System". Im very pleased, actually impressed with the build of this unit. Super solid Aluminum billet casing. Actual buttons (some programmable) for functions. Easy access to menus. Optional Battery mount installed. 2 SDI BNc inputs. HDMI input if you need. This company seems to cater to a DSLR using crowd. They offer sliders and even a reasonable looking full sized Steady Rig with a really interesting looking Arm. But don't be put off by all that, this is a much more professional build than you'd expect, feels more "pro" than Small HD honestly- and I don't mean to put down Small HD, the 703 is great, but it needs an additional kit to make it yoke mountable. I don't put too much stake in NITs, because we all know that mirror effect of glass trumps almost brightest...that being said, this monitor offers a 3000 NIT rating. My ONLY detracting point for this unit is that it employs a standard glass face which reflects like all of them. Its got a substantial bit more weight than the DP7 I also use as backup. which I believe the DP7 is the same or close weight to the 703. Its not as weighty as my now defunct Cinetronics Gen1. Which I miss. I really like the extra weight to help me preserve my monitor extension options. I am working on designing some weight system to put on a Gold mount plate that will help me tune it up for a little extra weight. As far as the company is concerned. Lara and Andrea were my two main contact in the process of purchasing. They were extremely communicative never letting more than 24 hours pass before responding to my emails. I paid with a bank transfer wire which I'm used to some after purchases of WAVE and and other items over the years. Not my favorite mode of transacting, but these guys really did leave me confident in their dealings over email. They also make a version of this monitor that incorporates a integrated digital level. they also offer that digital level as a separate unit. another Operator friend has purchased that level and feels like it is a really well conceived and executed unit. I cannot say enough about how high end this monitor feels. And now the clincher. With the optional gold mount batt plate installed, international shipping, and an included power cable (which they did custom for me at no extra charge) I paid less than $2300 USD. It mounted almost perfectly in my CamJam yoke set up for DP7. I added a slightly thicker set of delrin washers to big the 1mm or so gap. Just wanted to share this.
    2 points
  16. HD 6". That's just me, but I haven't felt a major need to use an 8", unless it's brighter. AND if it definitely doesn't have an internal horizon, then I'd stick with the 6". It's nicer because it's smaller and more nimble, and doesn't become so much of a sail in the wind.
    2 points
  17. I've owned the Betz Handhled rig for a number of years and if you are using one camera body for all modes, it is a wonderful device! The baby pin receiver on the bottom is a great addition . Both my ACs and my Dolly Grip on the film I just finished kept commenting on how it was the best setup they've seen. Andre, I do wish the camera were a little lower on the shoulder though - I often just put a long Steadicam plate (like the one Peter Abraham makes) on the bottom of the camera and place that directly on my shoulder so I can find the CG. I was switching between modes so often on this job that I wanted to use my XCS plate (best plate for use within the Wave because of the side-to-side adjustment) at all times and it is too short to put directly on the shoulder. Nice within the Betz unit though as you can slide it to find the CG.
    2 points
  18. Hi James! So far no big issues to speak of. The main thing is just the overall weight which does take some getting used to. Also because the sled has to be so long, I have kicked it it a few times when I was getting tired and careless in the middle of a shot. The R2 hid it a little but you could still see the jolt. Parts wise, it took about 4 months to get my Matrix + arm + vest from Smartsystem. Italy was hit real hard with covid and manufacturing there was hard, is what I hear. As far as the R2, I've had it for 2.5 years and never had an issue. The only issue I've ever had is with the batteries swelling. After ruining 4 batteries and doing ample research, the main thing I learned is: don't put them on the charger hot...ever. Let them cool down after operating before starting them on charge. Also try to keep them out of the sun and heat as much as possible. The batts are luckily pretty cheap but Lithium is very sought after right now + manufacturing is hard - so it's actually pretty hard to find the TB50s right now. The best option is to go directly thru DJI.com. I highly suggest getting all the bits and bops from Cinemilled that you may need. I have the Mitchell mount + universal mount for dolly work, the dovetail plate + lots of counter balance weight. The Pan tail plate for counterweights, and the extension rods for taller built cameras.
    2 points
  19. I also own an ArmX1. It‘s been many years that I have tested the G50x and I remember that I liked it, it‘s a good arm for sure. But, for many reasons I would go with the ArmX1, it‘s an amazingly smooth arm, very easy to handle and weighs nothing. On top, I love the mindset of Smartsystem as a company in terms of customer relations. You can always get a hold of them, they‘re very responsive and try to help as quick as possible. So yeah definitely worth its money. Cheers
    2 points
  20. Hi Donald, You’re right to assume that the answer is quite variable, but there are some rough guidelines that may help. One of the things that I particularly like to do at a workshop is to have a student take their post hand off of the gimbal completely. (Obviously leaving the other hand on the gimbal grip - no need to go totally hands free!) Many new operators get frustrated by what they see as “the rig wobbling”, and yet the moment I ask them to take their hand off, the rig floats magically through space without a wobble. However, as they then see, the camera is now aimlessly drifting, and the frame usually sucks. But hey, it’s stable! What this immediately shows, however, is that every “wobble” is coming from your hand. So the trick is to apply the input you need to frame the shot, but only that much input. There are times where you will need to apply more input - like stops and starts of a move, and there will be times where you need to apply less input, like a very slow consistent speed move. But the challenge of Steadicam is always applying just enough input to the sled. So, as to how that relates to pressure on the gimbal. The general rule of thumb I’ve found is that it’s almost always on the light side. Times when you need to apply more pressure would be when doing a tilt with a heavier drop time, or when counteracting violent stops and starts with a bottom heavy rig, or when changing directions mid-move. Apart from that, applying as little pressure as possible is the name of the game, as the tighter you are holding onto the gimbal, the more likely you are to make the rig wobble, or throw off the horizon, or cause pan wiggles. As for keeping the horizon level, that comes with practice, but there are a few additional tricks there. First of all, if you can, there are many new tools that can provide assistance for horizon as you’re operating (such as the Wave and Volt). While I think it’s important to learn how to operate without those tools, they have given a lot of operators the freedom to remove chasing the horizon from their attention loop while operating, and that’s incredibly freeing. It also takes away what was always one of the curses of Steadicam - it’s the only tool we regularly use on set which goes off level easily - so it makes it much easier for Steadicam work to blend in and be less obvious, something I know I appreciate. As for tricks without those fancy horizon aids, think about the blocking of your shots to avoid having to change direction unexpectedly. Every time you change direction or speed in the side to side axis, you introduce a tendency for the rig to go off level, and you will have to fight that. By blocking shots that limit these speed and direction changes, you limit the amount of times that you’ll need to be absolutely perfect. In addition, I run with a set of grid lines on my monitor, and regularly check them to the vertical and horizontal lines of the set. I also run a “CineLevel”, which is an acceleration compensated digital level that mounts on my rig, and seems rather effective at giving me a horizon readout, and it is relatively inexpensive, which is a pleasant surprise! Finally, and I’m sure others will echo this - if you haven’t, please find time to take a workshop or some private training from a reputable operator (and of those two options, I really recommend the workshop if you’re starting out, for a variety of reasons). While there is much you can learn on your own, and from videos and books, having experienced operators around you, critiquing you, and building your form is invaluable. In addition, there is a ton of nuance to how each individual operator crafts their shots, and handles their rig, and being around a group of extremely talented people gives you tons of people to “borrow” ideas and techniques from, and will vastly broaden your skill set in a very short period of time. If you can logistically and financially make it make sense, the SOA provides some of the best workshop experiences I’ve ever seen, and I’ve been lucky to be able to instruct there a few times.
    2 points
  21. I'd be so glad to fly down to the island to work on-site..... ;) Logical that you'd feel rocking when inertia the bottom is reduced. Spreading out the weight tends to suppress any rocking. It's very similar to balancing the rig. The faster the drop-time, the more minimized any off-balanced issues are to your fingers because the mass of the pendulum has been increased top to bottom, and the rig is holding itself upright rather aggressively. ( A 1 second drop opposed to a 3 second drop, for example ) I am a HUGE fan of taking an extra 2 minutes when doing a build to build the rig and then set the gimbal to neutral. Zero G, as I call it. Then very carefully arrange both axis so that the system is perfectly balanced. Even a slow drop time is using bottom-heaviness to overcome elements that are trying to pull the rig to one side or another. Only way to know if your build is perfectly centered is to trim fore/aft and side/side while neutral. Then, ASSUMING your gimbal itself is centered, your rig can and will behave exactly like a planetarium machine. You can tip it upside down and to an extreme axis- and it should hang there immobile. Any slow roll or sway is then easier to locate. I used to do it at workshops I taught. If there's a rolling or tilting that you cannot pin down to errant loose cables or trim, then cast your eyes to your gimbal itself. A useful bit to engage in every single time you build. It MUST be done out of the wind, of course. Any breeze will push a rig that's at neutral around. As to the issue of how to center your gimbal, there are written guides out there depending on which gimbal you are using. Glad to help you with this- but better to get those already well-proven guides into your hands. Which gimbal is it?
    2 points
  22. Buy & Sell in the SteadicamForum.com Marketplace at your Own Risk. All forum members and guests can browse the posts and ads in the Marketplace, however only Premium Members can create posts here. Upgrading to a Premium Membership requires a one-time $50 payment Once your payment has been made your SteadicamForum account will be upgraded in about 24 hours. Premium Members can create unlimited ads in the SteadicamForum Marketplace's For Sale & Wanted to Buy forums and also enjoy many other forum benefits including Increased Personal Message Store No Google Ads Relaxed editing restrictions The Marketplace is not for advertising products your company manufactures unless you are a paid advertiser. Marketplace FAQ and Rules: You can edit your Marketplace posts for up to 24 hours since originally posted. Your Marketplace posts cannot be deleted. When your item is sold, add a reply to your thread stating it has been sold. Moderators and administrators will not remove sold Marketplace posts. If you are a professional equipment broker you must be an advertiser or Site Sponsor to post. Buy & Sell in the SteadicamForum.com Marketplace at your Own Risk. SteadicamForum.com does not check, validate or warrant any information posted in this forum. Be very careful of scams.
    2 points
  23. Shameless plug: I make several of these brackets, and also make custom parts as well - go to jerryholway.com to find the most recent part and price list. Most of the brackets mount on rods, but a few mount to a long dovetail... here's one of them that expands for different width rod mounting:
    1 point
  24. BETZ Wave for sale $5500 Buyer pays for shipping included BETZ wave camera plates 2 blue plate risers screws p tap to wave power cinelive to wave power pro cinemahd to wave power x2
    1 point
  25. I'm brand new into steadicam myself (just bought my first rig last week) and I'd be horrified this being my first gig! Look at all those people! Yeah the horizon was floating around a bit, but it kind of ads to the energy of the event. You also had some great whip pans! Super confident landings on those. I'm sure some of the pros on here can provide some better feedback. Cheers,
    1 point
  26. Selling my Klassen Slinghshot rig. Condition is used, but everything works great. I Bought used and haven’t been using it much so want to pass it on. Built for someone who is 5’8” 180lb but there is some flexibility with this. DM for questions please. Includes Light, Medium, and Heavy elastics and two sets of hooks. Prefer local LA pick up, but willing to ship. Buyer pays shipping. $5500.
    1 point
  27. New Updated M1-2 SledCover Waterproof Polyurethane Coated 4 way Stretch for flexibility YKK Vision And Water Resistant Systems for super fast install and easy battery access. Ridgid Strataglass Switch Coverings Treated Tread Choice of Color $265
    1 point
  28. You can change your settings to take jpgs. 1. Start the Settings app. 2. Tap Camera. 3. On the Camera settings page, tap Formats. 4. Tap Most Compatible.
    1 point
  29. Betz Wave package for sale. Excellent condition, works perfectly, no scratches or blemishes. Package includes: 1. Betz Wave. 2. PRO 7" dovetail plate. 3. x3 PRO Lemo to Wave power cables. 4. x1 Anton Bauer P Tap to Wave power cable. 5. Original Betz Wave Pelican Case. $5500 USD, buyer pays shipping. Located in Atlanta.
    1 point
  30. thanks again Maxwel, really appreciate you taking the time for this detailed answer! looks like you found the solution immediately. i will get in touch with WK about that adapter. take care! :) best N
    1 point
  31. For Sale is this Proline Steadicam Stabilizer Black Edition XL Arm. I am the second owner of this arm that is a little over two years old. I purchased the arm while I was building a custom light weight Sled. What I really wanted to complete my build was to find a used NB Stabilizer arm, as I was keeping things light and my budget lean. So I purchased the Proline arm, from one of our SF members. I got it home and used it on a music video project (worked great btw). I was happy the system was complete and all was working great until another SF member listed a NB Stabilizer Arm, the one that I had wanted in the first place. You know how that goes. I tried to ignore the Marketplace add but couldn’t stop looking at it. Now I have two Arms and I don’t need them both. The Proline Arm does have some scratches and other mild signs of wear, but functions well. It’s No Tiffen or PRO Arm, but is smooth and gets the job done for a crazy low price. $2500 US obo. Free shipping in the USA. Here are the Arm’s specs from the Proline website: BLACK EDITION XL ARM 1 to 70 lb Payload using the same arm and same springs Effortless boom up and down super strong construction with Aluminum 7075 and stainless steel 80cm boom range without kickbacks Tortion and Friction free Made in the USA (Miami)
    1 point
  32. This Arm could be an affordable option to pair up with the ZeeGee or an excellent Backup Arm. The Price is: $2500 US and includes free shipping to anywhere in the USA.
    1 point
  33. Selling a Klassen Hard Mount (Only, no mitchell plate). Works perfectly. $595 or best offer. Located in LA.
    1 point
  34. Interested! Send me an email please. ironsidesmotion@gmail.com
    1 point
  35. Bump £11,000 + shipping
    1 point
  36. As long as I've owned my Master Series sled, two things have stuck out at me as being sore spots. Lack of modularity/self serviceability: Like most of us, I enjoy tinkering around inside my rig - adding, subtracting or repairing parts here and there. The Master Series sled was never designed to allow for someone to easily get inside and perform such tasks. Honestly, I never knew how easy it could be until one day, remembered clearly, I stopped by Alec J's place. He had a slight problem with his donkey box on his PRO/XCS/Jerry Hill rig. I watched aghast as, in under 60 seconds and with a single allen key, the donkey box was separated from the sled and sitting on his desk, easily displayed for servicing. Alec thought nothing of it until he saw the look on my face, and after a couple seconds of thought replied, "Oh yeah... you've got a Master rig." 90 seconds later, and I'm sure it was just to show off, he was holding his gimble in his hand spinning it like someone spins a basketball on their finger. We both stared at it hypnotically - him proud, me suicidal. Top stage: Flex. Lots of it. For 90% of my operating this was not an issue. The remaining 10%, however, that involved either a long lens or any sort of a run, those bastard micro-vibrations would show up. It was just a matter of design of the old Master stage, unfortunately. Combine those two sore spots together, and I was left with a bad top stage for which no remedy existed. A more modular rig with a part that just wasn't performing well, one could easily just order away for a replacement or an upgrade and swap it out themselves. In fact, my original top stage was the thumb screw/slide-in version which was just unacceptable, so I had to send the entire sled to LA to be upgraded to the better latch/drop-in version. Frustrating to spend all that money on shipping for just one small part. The stage was better, but still had more flex than I like. With no more upgrade options, really the only next step was to sell the entire sled and buy a new one - a prohibitively expensive option. Last summer on the forum a great deal came along for a used Donkey Box III, and I snatched it up knowing it was the stage I eventually wanted, but not knowing what sled would go under it. I'd either find a way to mount it on mine, or keep it around for the day when I finally do upgrade the whole thing. Long story short, it's now mounted atop my Master rig. It works great. It has the rigidity we need. And the best part is it was done with the absolute minimal modification to the sled itself. What this means is when it does come time for me to upgrade, if I choose I can easily put the old stage back on, and sell it as a complete Master sled, keeping the DBox for my new rig. I designed a junction box that would both house the connectors I need (same as my Master sled except for the size 2, 2pin LEMO on the back for isolated 12V which I've never ever needed), along with having a way to securely mate the DBox to the post. The only modification I had to do to the original sled was cut all the wires that run up the post. I reconnected them to the connectors in the new junction box. I bought cable mounted M & F LEMO connectors with the thought of adding them to the post wires, making for a simple attach/detach situation similar to the PRO and XCS posts currently, however, I didn't end up installing it for simplicity's sake. I also wanted to test everything out with as few variables in the equation as possible, and once it was actually working, I thought I'd just leave it alone. If I ever do have to open it back up, I'll likely then install the LEMO. So 7 months and counting and all is running swimmingly. One small down side is with the new junction box, stage, and an XCS plate, the cameras typically sit higher than they used to, forcing me to fly a slightly longer sled than before. I plan to buy a few of the low profile PRO plates to solve this. You can see it's still un-anodized. Again, I just wanted to test it first, before finishing it, and once it was up and running, I was happy. I thought I'd let my fellow Master Rig owners know that I do have 4 more of these boxes available (I had a run of 5 done). If anyone else is frustrated like I was and can get your hands on a Donkey Box, I'd happily help you upgrade. Just let me know. Best to all, Afton
    1 point
  37. Hey Remi, I bought a Volt the end of last year. Knowing Tiffen has (admittedly) had some problems with the Volt, I think you're on the right track to continue to carry a spare. I went a different route, purchasing the new Volt 1 3/4" gimbal, and the new XCS 1 3/4" carbon fiber post with PRO connectors. I had a XCS 2" carbon fiber post with PRO connectors before, with a XCS gimbal, and I keep that as my backup post / gimbal. I also am holding onto my Wave for now. With all the above, including a MDR4 (I still had an MDR2 on my sled), cases, cables, etc... it was close to $30K, but I have a solid system and am basically state of the art from an equipment standpoint. People are starting to ask for a Volt, but that's not why I bought it. It was really Garret's and Geoff Haley's comments on the Walking Backwards podcast that convinced me the Volt was more than a crutch for guys with bad horizons. Flying neutral balanced and removing all pendulum effect is very nice. I've also lightened up my sled quite a bit. Where I used to add weight to cameras for stability, now the Volt provides that stability in a lightweight setup. Aside from the operating advantages, I think the Volt will extend my career, much like I feel my Klassen harness did. The downside is that the Volt is not as robust as PRO or XCS gear. You will have issues, and it's frustrating. I've had more equipment issues in the last 4 months than 30 years of operating. Some of the issues were my lack of familiarity with the best way to setup and dial in the Volt. Tyson at Tiffen has been very responsive about working with me on this. But some of the issues were straight hardware failures (I had a motor go bad in the first month) and issues related to design flaws (like an assymetrical gimbal). When it works, I really am coming to like the Volt features, particularly changing headroom via the push of the button. Larry McKonkey's button extender is a must. I'm sorry I don't have any experience with modifying a PRO gimbal for the Volt. I would suggest sending both post and gimbal to Tiffen for fitting, which I did. If you decide to pull the trigger, give me a call and I'll point out a few deal points. Best, Mark
    1 point
  38. I am selling my steadicam package that includes everything you will need to walk right onto set. The package is barely used and in excellent condition. Here is a complete list of the items Cine live Pro Rig Volt gimbal system w/ 2 sets of cables Back up Pro GPI Gimbal “Brand New” GPI Pro Arm GPI Pro Vest Transvideo Montor w/Monitor Power cable Volt Docking bracket 12” Plate (2) Cine live to Arri power cables (2) Cine Live to Red power cables (2) Cine live to film camera Walter Klausin Garfield mount “Brand New” (2) Preston Motors Preston MDR2 (4) Preston Motor cables (3) Preston Power Cables (2) MDR on/off cables (8) Gold Mount Batteries (1) 4 battery charger (1) 2 battery charger Hill Docking bracket Bottom stage weather gear Innovative Cart Steadicam Stand Practice Weight Asking 65,000
    1 point
  39. I saw some people recommending the basic Gamma tennis wrap so I gave it a try and I've been enjoying it: https://www.amazon.com/Gamma-AGSO12-Supreme-Overgrip-Blue/dp/B000HEH34A/ref=sr_1_2?crid=34R93ZHGXIZB&keywords=gamma%2Bgrip&qid=1646358690&sprefix=gamma%2Bgrip%2Caps%2C66&sr=8-2&th=1 Get black though...I got blue and it starts looking scummy pretty quick.
    1 point
  40. Hello Matt, Reach out to Tiffen customer support at the link below and they will help you take care of this! https://tiffen.com/pages/contact
    1 point
  41. I usually go for a slower drop time when working super low mode. Hand above the gimbal... I don't have any tips... Do as I can ;-)
    1 point
  42. Cancellation in commercial world is 48h notice . they owe you full 10h salary and full rental .
    1 point
  43. I appreciate you for taking the time to write out all that information!
    1 point
  44. after all that... I didn't even include the model or link... https://www.smartsystem.it/product/smartcam-monitor-sm7-3k/ Happy Browsing
    1 point
  45. I’m in Los Angeles area! Text me for faster service 313-473-7335 ask for Mike
    1 point
  46. Hi Nicholaus I use the Smart System X1 arm and it performs as good as any “bigger brand” arms out there. I’ve been a steadicam operator for over 20 years and have used almost every arm out there from Pro to Tiffen. Smart System Gear will be at Cinegear this year as well if you’d like to come and see for yourself? The “fall under the heading of garbage” is just not an accurate statement. cheers Taj
    1 point
  47. I have used Cinema Product’s arms and now Tiffen’s arms for many, many years but I have tested PRO arms very carefully as well from time to time. I have a G70 and have not tried the new X design, but I would like to soon. Filming “Hugo” required me to carry two full size Alexas on a newly designed PACE 3D rig. I hope no one else will have to carry such a heavy package – it was considerably heavier than the IMAX packages I have flown over the years. <BTW: I began eager discussions of a two part ‘M’ version with Neil Fanthom, the lead Arri technician on “Hugo”, even as he coordinated the last modifications to these first factory release full size cameras. I finally used one of the ‘M’ prototypes during the last few weeks of “World War Z” and it was extraordinary: the same quality image with a fraction of the weight and size on my sled, most of the weight being carried by my hardworking grip on a backpack and connected only by a thin, very flexible fiber optic cable. The latest PACE 3D rigs now use the ‘M’.> The Tiffen G70 lifted this incredibly heavy load quite easily after adjusting the allen bolts at the end of the arm links to increase its top end lifting capacity. This weight was clearly more than the arm had been designed to handle, however, and it caused enough lateral twisting of the arm that the gimble handle had a strong tendency to “run downhill”, that is, the arm post was no longer vertical and the handle did not like to stay in the position I wanted it in. I had modified my arm to increase the friction when necessary to offset this precession, which occurs to a much lesser degree with more normal loads (the same thing happens with PRO arms especially with the lower friction design they use but to a slightly lesser extent) but the amount of twist was alarming and the boom response of the arm was not as linear as it normally is – it felt quite “springy”, more like the first CP arms than this much higher tech Tiffen version. I got in touch with Chris Edwards at Optical Support, the Steadicam dealer in London and arranged to test one of their PRO arms with the heaviest set of springs they could find in their inventory. I cranked them both to the top setting and it just handled the load. The overall reach of the arm was less, however, and did not work as well as my longer G70 with my Klassen back mounted harness. I have used a solid socket block that I designed, which does not include the spring loaded hinge design that all stock arms have, as I have found this hinge causes a loss of precision in controlling the sled when using a back mounted harness. Chris and I came up with a design for a long, rigid socket block design which he then fabricated and the Production rented this arm for the run of the show. I never adjusted the springs for the movie, even when changing lenses, as I never had too much lift with the lighter lenses, only slightly less than I would have preferred with the heavier lenses, but the linearity of the arm made it a very small issue. I found the PRO arm to be beautifully smooth and linear in response and I really liked using it. I still had some twist in this arm which I had to counter with a custom friction lock on the post mount, but it was a lot less alarming. After “Hugo” I went back to the G70 and really liked coming home to it as well. At more normal operating weights, they perform quite similarly. I have the bearing upgrade and that has helped the smoothness noticeably. I am anxious to try the new X model. The main differences I see are between the weights of the arms (the PRO is quite a bit heavier) and the ease of adjustment (the Tiffen arm is a joy to adjust) and of course the difference in cost. Overall the PRO probably requires less maintenance with the enclosed spring cartridges and massive structure but more effort adjusting which can sometimes result in operating a shot with a less than ideal setting, which does bother me some. The PRO is much easier to adjust than my previous CP arms, but I really, really like the easy tweaking of the G70 and have even changed the setting during a shot several times to improve the response. Particularly with the back mounted harness, which uses these arms in an orientation they were not designed for, fine tuning of either arm is more critical (I could never go back to a front mount, however, I would have to find a new career instead, the physical strain on my lower back is dramatically greater with a front mount vest - but I know other operators who can't imagine working with the back mounted harness...) That the significance of “ease of adjusting” is more than a convenience for the operator was made apparent to me on my first shot on “Snake Eyes”. I had worked with Brian DePalma on 5 or 6 films previously and so he was well used to my procedures. I called out “Ready” before the first rehearsal and Brian yelled out “Whoa, whoa, whoa!!” in response. It was rare to hear him talk much at all on set, even more so in a loud voice. “Why aren’t you fiddling?” he demanded. It took me a moment to realize what he was asking about. I was using both the new wireless motorized stage controller and the tool-free arm for the first time on one of his movies. He had learned to incorporate the amount of time required to get my Steadicam “tweaked” perfectly before each take into his calculations for doing a Steadicam shot. I now could make those tweaks as I strolled up to the start line and that had startled him. I never realized before that moment that this might impact more than my own sense of preparation and comfort level. Lesson learned… I am now operating my first TV show, “Nurse Jackie”, as an A/Steadicam Operator, and the pace is higher than on most of the features I have worked on, and the ease of adjustments of the sled and arm are a real advantage here as well. There is little patience on the part of the whole cast and crew for “tweaking” when we have many pages to get through before heading home. I would love to have both arms so I could choose the best tool for each setup, but that is not financially feasible. I think they are both extraordinary instruments, much improved over Garrett’s original design, which was an extraordinary achievement in itself, resulting not from improvements, but from a whole new concept never before imagined. The relatively subtle improvements in that design which these two companies have produced are welcome, especially as the requirements and expectations of increasingly sophisticated operators have increased over the years. I love the diversity of choices now, each new design pushes the development from every manufacturer and we are the beneficiaries.
    1 point
  48. I think a cage match is due!! Some kind of engineering duel !! I'd buy a ticket to that one. Arms/dynamic balance etc Neither would convince the other to change his mind but it would be fun to watch ( and learn ). JA
    1 point
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