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Jeroen van der Poel

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Jeroen van der Poel last won the day on February 21

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About Jeroen van der Poel

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    steadicam provid

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  1. wow really inspiring, all the choices you made here.. all the anticipations for the next framing etc.. mindblowing!
  2. looking to buy a bridge and standard block for a lx vest.
  3. Iam looking for a g50x in good condition, iam based in Amsterdam Email me : Poel.jeroenvander@gmail.com
  4. hey folks, ive been training and training, and i kind of like the provid sled and mainly use the green screen monitor now. The gimbal can handle a lot of payload, and with a decimator everything works. But what i dont like is the provid arm. Whatever i do after 30 seconds of operating there is always one arm segment that locks up (upright or down)and then the other goes as well because i want to maintain my camera height... I really tried everything..its damm stiff , i would already be very happy with a arm that will stay horizontal, because if they lock up there is no vertical stablisation.. after i managed to learn how to control the gimbal, how to have a smooth walk, it seems to be pointless to proceed my study because right now the only think i concentrate is the arm..while i want to work on my framing and navigation! It seems to be a problem of a weak arm design, and also because its non iso elastic. Because i want to become better and improve my craft iam thinking about upgrading to a different arm. That brings in two problems. 1: is there a assy bridge plate for my vest with the standard socket block? ( i have the older one which sucks) , i found a couple of them here: http://www.tiffen.com/results.html…, but dont know if they have the right dimensions for my vest (which i dont want to give up, because the vest fits quite nicely). 2 what would be a reasonable arm to look after ( i will operate a camera in between 12 and 32 pounds added the weight of the sled batteries and monitor i think that will be around 17- 40 pounds...) I think my budget for the upgrade would be maximum 7k. It needs to be reasonable because once i have a new arm i already know i want a new sled, or upgrade the top stage, hd monitor new wiring etc.. Iam just looking for something thats a hughe improvement considering that i have been training with this provid arm for two months! Would love to hear your opinions! (p.s. here s a poor picture of my rig, i added some weights in a small cardboard box with velcron to my battery, its now hundred percent in dynamic balance!)
  5. By the way,.. One last question... Iam seeking into a small low budget option to better balance my rig. My camera is slightly to light for my provid arm so iam adding weight to the camera. But since I don't have a yoke for my Archer monitor I cannot expand my monitor horizontally, so I always end up displacing my monitor vertically on the post, or change my battery's (I have several batteries with different weights),. If I would attach a battery (just for the sake of balancing not to power something) right under the post on the bottom of my sled with a cheap adapter plate, the relative difference in weight and position between the monitor and rear battery would be smaller and thus the rig would be easier to get in balance. Since I started to add weight to the camera I had to extend the post, I could undo that with this additional weight. Iam I thinking in the right direction, or should I start researching a monitor yoke?
  6. Soon people will populate Mars and eventually they need some steadicam ops to document what they are doing and then you can start all over, but for now the book is closed. And you have the M1 volt to focus on. Exciting times!
  7. Last week I made a awkward post about dynamic balance. After reading and schooling myself about centrifugal forces I found this very clarifying pdf from Jerry Holway with both a mathematical approach and empirical approach towards dynamic balance. If you search on this forum for the tags dynamic balance I feel very sorry for Jerry, I can imagine it gets him a lot of headaches. Therefor I think any person who tries to make a new post (like me) should instantly be forwarded to this article: https://www.google.nl/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://www.tiffen.com/dynamic%2520primer.pdf&ved=0ahUKEwiaqLLKutTXAhVBK8AKHTCHCT4QFgglMAA&usg=AOvVaw0XZYXuK6mEasmXF_269YDu Of course in reality there are several methodes to achieve dynamic balance but ever since iam studying this article (with the help of my father who is science teacher), I start to see that every adjustment I make on my rig always leads back to this article. As a beginning operator I feel more confedent knowing what my rig does on planet earth. Thanks to Jerry for writing this great piece (even though it's tough math there is even some humor to get you through the article)
  8. I checked Fawcett video read the operators book again and I feel very stupid and sorry for my existence on this forum. But: my rig is in dynamic balance now, and I will promise that my next post will be much better. Thanx everyone!
  9. i think i already managed with the dynamic balance.. i first found my c.g. with the help of a rod underneath my camera.. Then attached it to the sled with the marker above the post. Then started to work around with my monitor and battery of the sled until it was in static balance, then gave it a precise spin and after 20 rounds of spinning it was still in dynamic. With a 3 second drop time, and dynamic balance i couldnt be more heapy. Now resume the training!
  10. Hey Axel, Thanks for your reply. I did the tip toe test and it doesnt fly away, the problem is more that always one of the arm segments tends to go all the way up or down after a while. Since iam holding the farest arm segment that attach to the gimble, its mostly the vest arm segment that either goes up or down after a while, but i guess thats normal for such a arm. But i just wanted to see that confirmed.. After adding lanparte weights.. it seemed that my dynamic balans is a bit off.. The provid sled has a extendable battery plate but in my case a non extendable monitor I work with a archer tft monitor. If i take the camera off it seems that i get the rig in balance by putting a more heavier battery on my sled.. Ive read a lot about dynamic balance, but i never saw people getting their rig in static balance without a camera on top. Isnt that the best way to archieve dynamic balance? Furthermore i extended my lanparte battery pinch plate on my camera to get a longer setu, and today i extended my post and for me including a long drop time of 3.5 seconds that seems to fly the best. Would love to get some advice on dynamic balance... If my rig isnt static balanced without the camera, and the monitor side is to heavy could put my monitor higher up. What do you recommend to experiment with dynamic balance. In the beginning i didnt bother about it but since i do a lot of switches en quicker turns, it start to become more important in my training program!
  11. Hey, Iam new to this forum and recently bought a Steadicam Provid with the old socketblock. Of course it took me some time to adjust this pen but eventually i managed. And after training and watch every possible steadicam tutorial its about time to make my first post. Because the Provid arm is not iso elastic i found some problems with it, first of all my 7 kg camera seemed to be to light weighted i had to relax the arm springs all the way, and then it started to bounce ( i simply couldnt find the right adjustment, either it dropped or rised), so i added 3kg weight to the camera. The second problem i was running in was how to adjust the arm, when both bones are in horizontal position, and i adjust them for that, and i go all the way up and the down, one segment always locks up, and the other way as well. I think that seems to be normal since the arm dont go back to their middle position because they are not iso elastic. Right now iam training to walk the steadicam without touching, so handsfree, if you look closely you will still see some bounce. Of course i have to accept that i dont have the budget for a iso elastic arm, and the steadicam is still thousands times better then my own capacities and still lots of work to do on my left hand to maintain my horizon. But maybe theres someone who could advice me how to get things better. (p.s. i will go to a steadicam class in the future, right now this is self taught) when i have my hands on the rig its seems that i already manage to keep my horizon, i work with a 3 to 4 second drop time.. Today i installed a long rope between two c stands and tried to keep my lens height the same, are their other trainings i could invest in? it seems that the camera flies a bit better when i relax the springs a bit more so they drop very slow when i dont touch the rig so i have to have a bit tighter grip with my right hand Here is the link to a test video handsfree (s35mm with a 24mm prime): I touched it a couple times to make the pan, but also to get the horizon back to normal https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xOBtkHSzK_M
  12. Hey, Iam new to this forum and recently bought a Steadicam Provid with the old socketblock. Of course it took me some time to adjust this pen. And after training and watch every possible steadicam tutorial its about time to make my first post. Because the Provid arm is not iso elastic i found some problems with it, first of all my 7 kg camera seemed to be to light weighted i had to relax the arm springs all the way, and then it started to bounce, so i added 3kg weight to the camera. The second problem i was running in was how to adjust the arm, when both bones are in horizontal position, and i adjust them for that, and i go all the way up and the down, one segment always locks up, and the other way as well. I think that seems to be normal since the arm dont go back to their middle position because they are not iso elastic. Right now iam training to walk the steadicam without touching, so handsfree, if you look closely you will still see some bounce. Of course i have to accept that i dont have the budget for a iso elastic arm, and the steadicam is still thousands times better then my own capacities and still lots of work to do on my left hand to maintain my horizon. But maybe theres someone who could advice me how to get things better. (p.s. i will go to a steadicam class in the future, right now this is self taught) when i have my hands on the rig its seems that i already manage to keep my horizon, i work with a 3 to 4 second drop time.. Here is the link to a test video handsfree (s35mm with a 24mm prime): https://youtu.be/xOBtkHSzK_M thanks to all the contributors of this forum which already taught me so much!!
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