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Charles Unice

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  • Rig
    Arri Trinity, Arri Artemis Cine broadcast, Tiffen G70x, Exovest
  • Location
    Utah

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  • Website
    Steadic4.com
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    Steadic4

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  1. Lol copy that! I know arri makes a cover for their battery hanger, maybe that would work or you could make your own out of plastic/vinyl.
  2. The camera we usually cover with a cap-it. The sled/monitor- good ol Saran Wrap/plastic wrap/cling wrap!
  3. Ryan, dm me and I’d be happy to talk to you. Also all the trinity ops are in a fb group, until arri gets their forum going! Trinity is hard! It’s not just about physical ability. You have to learn the basics before you add on more complications. Steadicam is hard by itself, and I’d say trinity is harder. You have more things to be aware of, more things to learn, more things to worry about. It also costs a lot more. Arri suggests your a steadicam op for at least 4 years before picking up a trinity, because it’s hard. They want you to have a working knowledge of steadicam (because the basics are the same) before you add all the trinity moves on top of the basics. It’s also good to have that knowledge in case your trinity has a malfunction. You can swap over to normal steadicam and keep going. Sure you won’t be able to do trinity moves but at least you have some sort of a backup. If your only a trinity op, you will not be able to operate a normal steadicam. They are that different. That’s just scratching the surface. There’s loads more reasons why, If you want to talk more feel free to dm me! Charles
  4. Isaac, almost all of my equipment is in various sized pelican air cases. They work well! Not as tough as the storm series but the weight savings is worth it.
  5. Sean, I agree with Maxwel! I started with a zephyr and then had an older GPI and now I have an Arri Artemis/ trinity. I would jump over to the for sale section and set up some notifiers. So when equipment is posted for sale you can get an email letting you know what’s for sale. I would buy used as this stuff gets expensive quick, and your 25k can go fast. Right now some one is selling a tiffen G70x for 11k pretty good deal for that arm. It’s what I use, I love it. Or find a G50x they are about 1/2 the cost of the G70x. Sleds get listed all the time, but the good ones go fast. So you have to stay on it. Lots of old GPI rigs, I’d say start there if you can find one. They are solid and work well. Even the old ones. Just make sure they have been updated to HD. batteries I recommend buying new, you never know how old ones where treated, or how many cycles are on them. Check out Batteries4broadcast! They are really good and inexpensive for a set of 4 and a charger and Kevin is really good to work with. The 2 other ops in my town use them as well. happy hunting.
  6. Kyle, I just went through this with my Trinity, and my Artemis! I had a cable get pinched by an AC, in a pelican case. I had to scramble to get it fixed in the middle of a shoot. Now I have double/ duplicates of everything, so I can tell you what I did. I purchased double of everything because I now like to have backups, you never know when a cable is going to go bad and if you only have one… you could be screwed. sdi/ bcc cables I like to carry an assortment of lengths. I like the kind from shape they are super thin. power cables for all the cameras you think you will fly. Depending on your sled, 2pin Leno (or whatever your sled output is) to dtap for camera accessories and power. thats a start. Once you start working on set you figure out what you like to have and what you need. I keep everything in a camera essentials cable wallet. I have 2 of them that are identical and labeled so an AC can go in there and see where everything is. I keep all my rain gear in my pelican with my vest so it’s always there but that’s just my O.C.D. Also keep tools with you, Alan sets, screwdrivers, wrenches, etc. you’ll use tools all the time setting up and tearing down cameras. I always like to beat my AC’s to the tools. Don’t forget to label and mark everything with your name/colors. Things tend to wander off if it’s not marked. Other than that the best way to learn is from experience. So get out there and start working on stuff.
  7. Check out https://shop.cam-jam.de/product/external-tilthead/ Pretty solid products!
  8. Any more information you can lend us would be helpful... how long have you been oping? previous sleds?
  9. Kendry, I have not personally used the x1 but I know several operators that use it and love it. From what I can see its an excellent arm and reasonably priced. The ops that have them love them. But that's all I can say bout it. I personally use the G70x. I use to use a GPI pro, and before that the tiffin zephyr arm. GPI makes a solid arm that's super smooth, but got sick of having to cary around T-handle wrench to make adjustments on the PRO arm. Specially when I would bounce from show to show every other day or so and my camera wights would change. G70x and G50x you do not need tools. All the adjustment nobs are built into the arm. Its fast and easy and you don't look like you'r constantly fidgeting with your equipment and fumbling with tools. Pretty sure Tiffen/Garret have the patient on this and that's why no one else has a system like it. The ease of adjusting the ride or the lift is so easy and tool less, I love it!! You also don't have to swap out canisters/springs when you go form a super light camera to a super heavy camera. G70x can do ~13lbs to 70lbs by just turning the nobs. I believe the x1 also requires hex wrench to make adjustments. So that's my reason behind it. I recommend going to a show or seeing if other ops near you have different arms and see if you can try them out before you buy. It's a very personal piece of equipment (like all steadicam gear) and they all do some things different than each other. So its good to try them out before you spend any amount of money on an arm. Hope this helps
  10. I’m currently an Arri trinity op, but I started out with the zephyr! Looks like your having fun Manuel! My advice would be to be careful having the post extended all the way out, my experience with the zephyr is it caused vibrations when moving fast. And don’t push the arm to its full weight capacity it likes to be around 5-10lbs under or some where in the middle for optimal dampening. hope that helps have fun!
  11. Depending on how tall and wide you are… I keep my vest in a pelican air 1637. No foam, just line it with a yoga mat! I’m 5’10” and 145lbs. There’s extra room if you are a bit taller and wider. Fits perfectly without needing to change anything. I just a take the vest off slide in my rain bag and lay it in and close the lid. Rain bag slides into the vest cavity! it’s a small gym bag that I keep a spare change of cloths, deodorant and things, and all my rain gear! Works great!!!
  12. BJ talk to your Trinity rep, I’m guessing it’s Alan. When I asked about rain cover for the head he said cover the camera like normal, the base/ electronics of the trinity head, they wrap in shield wrap/car wrap and don’t do anything for the motors. They say the motors are fine to get wet. I did this for an ASUS commercial in Washington state Olympic park where it rained on us for 3 days strait. Had no problems! In case you didn’t know there is a Facebook group for trinity ops, you can reach most of us there including Curt Schaller. As opposed to here. Not many trinity ops here.
  13. I’ve got an old Cinetronic I’m going to be selling soon. Has digital level and I used to have it on a zephyr when I first started out. Works great and is bright.
  14. If I lived in La I totally would. I’m looking for a wheel option different than what is currently offered.
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